Brothers Elliot and Ryle Olsen prepared some Christmas trees at A Knot in Thyme north of Oak Harbor for sale at their grandfather’s holly farm. Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times

Brothers Elliot and Ryle Olsen prepared some Christmas trees at A Knot in Thyme north of Oak Harbor for sale at their grandfather’s holly farm. Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times

Find a fantastic fir for your Whidbey Christmas

There are plenty of tannenbaums to choose from on the island.

The Christmas season is in full swing and people are getting ready to deck the halls with a fragrant tannenbaum.

Here are a few places to find a fresh fir on the island, although decorators on a budget could just go the Charlie Brown route and spruce up a branch.

All tree sellers ask that customers wear masks and practice social distancing, and said this year hot cider and sleigh rides will be missing because of the pandemic.

North End

One popular Christmas tree farm on the island, Pacific Winds Farm in Oak Harbor, is closed this season after it was recently sold. According to the farm’s Facebook page, the new owners plan to reopen in 2021.

A Knot in Thyme, 4233 Degraff Road, Oak Harbor

Customers can find Christ-mas trees, as well as handmade garland and wreaths at this North End holly farm.

After selling out the first order of a couple hundred trees, A Knot in Thyme recently received another round of pre-cut trees available for sale beginning this weekend. Prices range from $38 to a couple hundred dollars, depending on size and species, said owner Wendy Rawls, adding the most popular tree is a 6- or 7-foot noble fir for about $80.

Holiday decorators can also buy wreaths, garlands and swags that are made onsite using sprigs from the farm’s 300 holly trees, and the shop has a variety of ornaments and gifts inside. For information, check the website or call 360-240-1216.

Oak Harbor Lions Club, parking lot next to the Oak Harbor Chamber of Commerce building at 32630 Highway 20

Club President Ed Green’s advice is simple: Buy now.

In its first weekend, the club sold about half of its inventory, he said.

“We’re about 247 percent above what we were last year,” of sales, Green said.

Prices range from $20-$100 per tree from 2 to 12 feet tall. The most popular tree is a Douglas fir, though the club has other varieties too, Green said.

The club sells trees every year as a fundraiser to support the club’s mission to support hearing and vision causes. The club will be selling trees daily until they are sold out.

Hennrich Tree Farm1650 Hastie Lake Road, Oak Harbor

Customers can cut their own festive firs at Hennrich Tree Farm just south of Oak Harbor beginning Dec. 5. The farm provides saws and is open on weekends while supplies last. Call 360-914-1076 for information or visit the farm’s Facebook page.

South End

Venture Out Plant Nursery3693 Scriven Lane, Langley

The Langley nursery has about 150 Christmas trees left after the Thanksgiving weekend. Trees range in price from $45-$500, depending on the height of a Douglas, Fraser or noble fir. Ty Kane, Christmas tree manager, said that most trees cost between $60-$100 and that noble firs are some of the most popular.

Staff will help customers load them and the nursery has a tree shaker to rid extra water and loose needles before heading home. Kids may also want to bring a letter to Santa to leave in the nursery’s elf house. For information, call 360-321-9931.

Shults Scattered Acres Tree Farm7111 Heggenes Road, Clinton

The decades-old tree farm in the South End is open for U-Cut Christmas tree hunting this year by appointment only. Douglas firs cost between $30-$40 up to 12 feet tall. Noble and Shasta firs and pine trees are $9 per foot. Customers are welcome to bring their own saws although the farm will have saws available for use. Owner Patty Shults and her husband, Tony, have been in charge of the farm since the 1980s and took it over from Tony’s father who began it in 1941.

It’s geared toward families and dogs are welcome so long as they are on a leash, she said.

For information or to make an appointment call 360-341-4198.

Was & Has Tree Farm7140 Linda Lane, Clinton

There are plenty of trees at Was & Has Tree Farm this year waiting to be picked out. Owner Cassanda Dargitz said prices range between $7-$12 per foot depending on the species. The farm has Douglas and noble firs available.

The farm is open by appointment Monday-Wednesday and is open to the public the rest of the week.

This year is Dargitz’s first year open for Christmas trees and she said she hopes to have more varieties in the future.

Call 360-674-8065 for information or to make an appointment.

Olsen brothers Ryle, 12, Elliot, 10, and Titus, 9, were helping their grandfather, Jack Rawls, get some Christmas trees ready for the weekend at A Knot in Thyme north of Oak Harbor. Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times

Olsen brothers Ryle, 12, Elliot, 10, and Titus, 9, were helping their grandfather, Jack Rawls, get some Christmas trees ready for the weekend at A Knot in Thyme north of Oak Harbor. Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times

Alex Barron and Skylar Ponton found a Christmas tree at the Oak Harbor Lions Club annual sale next to the Chamber of Commerce building before the tannenbaums are gone. Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times

Alex Barron and Skylar Ponton found a Christmas tree at the Oak Harbor Lions Club annual sale next to the Chamber of Commerce building before the tannenbaums are gone. Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times

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