Editorial: Spread our native plants

  • Wednesday, January 17, 2007 1:00pm
  • Opinion

Whidbey Islanders would be wise to take advantage of the annual native plant sale sponsored by the Whidbey Island Conservation District.

The district is taking orders for a large variety of native plants, ranging from the towering Douglas fir to the pretty dogwood and humble kinnickkinnick. There are some 40 available plants listed in the district’s Web site at whidbeycd.org and prices are low, from $3.20 for a fir tree to $12 for a shrub called mock orange.

We should all do what we can to retain the Northwest’s native plants which protect our environment and define our character. Our native plants are generally humble, unobtrusive and blend in with the surrounding, just like its people.

Native plants thrive in our climate of 10 wet months followed by two dry months and require no watering or artificial fertilizers. On Whidbey Island, thousands die every time a lot is cleared for a new home. Developers should retain as many native plants as possible, and homeowners should replace as many as they can to help preserve our Northwest landscape and heritage.

The Whidbey Island Conservation District is taking orders through January, with plants to be picked up Feb. 28 at the Greenbank Farm. Visit the Web site today, or call 678-4708.

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