Caroline Gardner of Fennel Forest Farm arranges her plant starters Saturday at the Coupeville Farmers Market. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

Caroline Gardner of Fennel Forest Farm arranges her plant starters Saturday at the Coupeville Farmers Market. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

Farmers markets open for season

Vendors and visitors braved wind and rain Saturday as Coupeville launched the 2019 farmers market season.

Tents were in a different location on the Community Green while construction of a new municipal parking lot is underway; the town has made parking available on the grass near the library. The Coupeville Farmers Market runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays.

Market Manager Peg Tennant said there are new vendors on the list this year, but many won’t be setting up until later this spring.

“Hopes for an early spring died with the snow in February,” she said.

Locally made products, plants and pizza were among the items available over the weekend. Caroline Gardner of Fennel Forest Farm said her covered raised beds allowed her to stay on-track with her plant starters despite the cold end to winter. At her tent, she offered a variety of starter plants, including chamomile, oregano and marjoram. She said veggies will come along later in the season.

Bayview Farmers Market opens April 27 and Market Manager Sharon Warwick said there’ll be a variety of new vendors this year. Attendees can expect to see new faces selling pie, art, food and essential oils. There’ll be plenty of familiar faces as well, she said. Bayview Market runs 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays on Bayview Road.

South Whidbey Tilth Market opens 11 a.m., Sunday, April 28, on Thompson Road. That Sunday, the Langley market will kick off the season with its Second Annual Nettle Festival, according to the market’s website.

Oak Harbor’s opening day is May 23. Tennant, who is also the Oak Harbor market manager, said the growing season delayed its start a bit and the market organizers try to have a full inventory before opening.

“We want to make sure to have a good selection in order for people to come back,” she said.

North Whidbey Farm owner Kimberly Christensen organizes her booth Saturday at the Coupeville Farmers Market while Rick Peek peruses her selection of goat milk products. The Central Whidbey opening day marked the first of the island markets. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

North Whidbey Farm owner Kimberly Christensen organizes her booth Saturday at the Coupeville Farmers Market while Rick Peek peruses her selection of goat milk products. The Central Whidbey opening day marked the first of the island markets. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

More in Life

John and Rebecca Roberts have been trail angels for the Pacific Northwest Trail since 2012.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Wandering the rugged Pacific Northwest Trail

The trail snakes down the island on its often-confounding route from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean.

Elizabeth Johnson and rescue dog Wilbur
Island a haven for practitioners of holistic treatments

Some holistic healers on Whidbey have seen a dramatic increase in demand this past year.

Sherman, Phyllis
Rockin’ a Hard Place: A beautiful remembrance to heal a forgettable time

Each of us has that wonderful remembrance to treasure.

South Whidbey Homeless Coalition donation by Rotary
South Whidbey Rotary clubs donate to Homeless Coalition

Last Friday, the two Rotary Clubs on South Whidbey presented Executive Director… Continue reading

South Whidbey Homeless Coalition donation by Rotary
South Whidbey Rotary clubs donate to Homeless Coalition

Last Friday, the two Rotary Clubs on South Whidbey presented Executive Director… Continue reading

Annual Whidbey Gardening Workshop grows online this year

The island-wide gardening event is back this year after it was cancelled due to the pandemic.

Whidbey writer’s hospice book released in paperback

Oak Harbor author Karen J. Clayton’s book, “Demystifying Hospice: Inside the Stories… Continue reading

Reading to dog
Therapy dogs go online

Reading with Rover pairs pooches with young readers

Lead actress Shannyn Sossamon talks with filmmakers Andrew Morehouse, left, and Nate Bell while filming “The Hour After Westerly” at the Fort Casey Inn. Photo by Wes Anthony/Firehouse Creative
Film featuring Whidbey free to view temporarily

“The Hour After Westerly” is free to view online until Jan. 17.

Mead maker Jeremy Kyncl pours a tasting glass of Hawthorn Tulsi Mead, a blend of hawthorn berry and holy basil, in the new Whidbey tasting room of Hierophant Meadery. Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record
From bluff to bluff: Meadery off to sweet start

Hierophant Meadery in Freeland features local honey in its sweet brews.

Susie Van
WI Drive helping to get the elderly, disabled where they need to go

A Langley woman gives rides to people in need in her new van named “Cookie.”

t
A Hero for All Time: Research reveals a decorated former Fort Casey soldier

Coupeville woman writes book about local WWI soldier who gained Col. George S. Patton’s admiration.