Town Council approves new sign code

After months of work and review, Coupeville Town Council last week approved its new sign code.

The final draft reflects additions and changes that account for more flexibility in promoting community events and information.

The most significant change to the final draft is the allowance of A-frame signs and banners for locations zoned public/quasi-public, said Town Planner Owen Dennison. These areas include town parks, the library, churches and other public spaces such as county office buildings and town hall.

“This change is intended to address concerns expressed by the planning commission and public commenters that prior versions of the draft sign regulations did not adequately provide for short-term advertising for community events and organizations, particularly of those groups without a fixed physical location,” Dennison said.

The new code allows for banners up to 30 square feet.

This may be smaller than some of the signs put up on the fence by the highway, he said, “but it’s still a substantial size for attracting attention for the motoring public.”

Banners are allowed to be up for 14 consecutive days, while A-frame signs are allowed to be in the right-of-way for up to three consecutive days.

The new code also removed limits on temporary window signs. Prior versions of the code restricted all window signs to a cumulative 25 percent of the window area. Now business owners don’t have to include posting temporary signs such as flyers for community events in the 25 percent restriction.

The intent, Dennison said, is to have small-scale, pedestrian-oriented signs.

Businesses are also now allowed to include a small rotating sign as part of the 25 percent allowance. The idea is for businesses like restaurants to be able to include a fixed spot where menus can be swapped in and out as they change.

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