Eric Leiberman of Island Art Glass shapes a glass-blown lily using a large pair of tweezers. (Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record)

Eric Leiberman of Island Art Glass shapes a glass-blown lily using a large pair of tweezers. (Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record)

Whidbey Island Art Trail kicks off its 10th season next week

Some of Whidbey’s galleries, sculpture parks and studios will be open to the public.

After a year off because of the pandemic, the Whidbey Art Trail will be open next week for its 10th season.

Starting June 1, art connoisseurs are invited to take a self-guided tour through some of Whidbey’s galleries, sculpture parks and studios.

Artists who are willing to host and educate visitors year-round are invited to apply. The trail runs until May 31, 2022.

Studio visits are encouraged and every Whidbey Art Trail member is following COVID-19 guidelines.

Whidbey Art Trail, working in partnership with the Whidbey Island Arts Council, is a nonprofit organization promoting the arts on Whidbey Island.

This year, 24 artists signed up to be on the map, representing just about every corner of the island. A full list of participants is available at whidbeyarttrail.com.

Robert Adamson and Janis Swalwell of Island Art Glass have been a part of the Whidbey Art Trail every year.

The couple’s glass-blowing studio in Langley is open 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays and weekdays by appointment.

Adamson, who has been working with glass for over 50 years, said the Whidbey Art Trail helps bring more people than usual to Island Art Glass.

Creations from the studio include colorful lilies, birds, fish, bowls and vases.

Mary Ellen O’Connor of Willow Pond Studio has also been a part of the Whidbey Art Trail since its first year. The Coupeville artist specializes in handmade wall panels and jewelry in copper, silver and gold.

“I love the idea of the art trail as a way to bring people living on Whidbey, as well as visitors, off the beaten path and into the studios of artists,” she said.

“I think seeing art being created helps people understand what it takes to make a piece of work,” O’Connor said.

Her studio is open by appointment. Visitors will discover that in her studio, her motto is “Creativity is not a pretty sight.”

Robbie Lobell of Cook on Clay is a founding member of the Whidbey Art Trail.

“When we lived in Coupeville down on a dirt road on 11 acres, getting people to our studio, the visitors needed to really want to go there,” she said.

Her studio recently moved near downtown Langley, where it has greater visibility. A grand opening is scheduled for June 11-13.

When open, hours will be 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Monday and by appointment.

Lobell, who specializes in making flameproof cookware, said the art trail map allows people to focus on a certain art medium or a specific region of the island.

Don Singleton of Island Art Glass makes a stem for a glass-blown lily. (Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record)

Don Singleton of Island Art Glass makes a stem for a glass-blown lily. (Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record)

Singleton uses the flame of a gas torch to heat up a glass-blown lily. (Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record)

Singleton uses the flame of a gas torch to heat up a glass-blown lily. (Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record)

A finished glass-blown lily in the garden of Island Art Glass. (Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record)

A finished glass-blown lily in the garden of Island Art Glass. (Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record)

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