Kyle Flack, of Bell’s Farm, harvests some beans from the garden. The Farm’s produce will be featured at Langley and Coupeville farmers markets, the Harvest Faire, Sept. 30 at Greenbank Farm, and in dishes served at Christopher’s on Whidbey during Whidbey Island Grown Week, Sept. 28 to Oct. 7. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

Kyle Flack, of Bell’s Farm, harvests some beans from the garden. The Farm’s produce will be featured at Langley and Coupeville farmers markets, the Harvest Faire, Sept. 30 at Greenbank Farm, and in dishes served at Christopher’s on Whidbey during Whidbey Island Grown Week, Sept. 28 to Oct. 7. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

Whidbey Grown Week showcase for island’s offerings, local farms

The second annual Whidbey Island Grown Week will feature more activities, local food and unique experiences than last year.

The event, which starts Sept. 28, aligns with Whidbey Island Grown’s mission to promote local farmers, businesses and products.

“Working together, we feel we can strengthen each other’s businesses throughout Whidbey Island,” said John Burks, chairman of the group’s steering committee.

More members have joined since the inaugural 10-day event happened in 2017, and more individuals and businesses are participating, Burks said.

A self-guided Ebey’s Reserve Farm Tour from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sept. 29 will include nine farms in the Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve and small demonstrations, food samples or activities at each location.

“It’s a chance for people to see what’s being produced here on Whidbey Island,” said Burks, who owns Kettle’s Edge Farm.

Traci York, a local food blogger, will be doing cooking demonstrations using produce from Kettle’s Edge at the farm during the tour.

Liz Sherman, of Sherman’s Pioneer Farm, will show different ways to use the family’s sugar Hubbard squash.

Sherman said this will include samples of breakfast, lunch and dinner foods as well as smoothies and other bites.

Burks said people who take a selfie at each of the farms and post it to Whidbey Island Grown’s social media pages with #WIGWeek2018 will win a prize. The tour includes Eckholm Farm, Lavender Wind Farm, Bell’s Farm, Prairie Bottom Farm, Rosehip Farm and Garden and Pacific Rim Institute.

Whidbey Island Grown Week lasts until Oct. 7, and includes businesses and farms across the island.

Some local stores have special deals for the week, such as Sweet Mona’s in Langley, which will offer a free two-piece sampler to customers that mention Whidbey Island Grown.

Several member organizations partnered for a farm-to-table dinner on Sept. 30.

A Passport Tour of Maxwelton Valley on Oct. 6 and 7 will allow participants to get stamped at Spoiled Dog Winery, Venture Out Nursery, the Organic Farm School and Whidbey Island Distillery. Those who fill their passports will be entered to win prizes.

Each stop offers a tour and tasting.

“I think there definitely has been an increased amount of energy and activity with the membership,” Burks said of this year’s event.

“We’re an all volunteer organization. We really rely on the members to define what they want and how they participate.”

Bell’s Farm will be featuring its produce during the Ebey’s Farm Tour, at the Harvest Faire at Greenbank Farm on Sept. 30 and at a “know your farmer, know your chef” event.

“It’ll be a busy week, but we like to be busy,” said Paige Mueller, of the farm.

Christopher’s on Whidbey will partner with Bell’s Farm to create “simple dishes” that highlight the farm’s produce, according to restaurant owner and chef Andreas Wurzrainer.

Free samples will be available of salad, soup and roasted vegetables from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m., Oct. 2. at the restaurant’s Pantry.

“It’s not so much about the complexity of the any dish as it is about letting the product shine,” said Wurzrainer.

Mueller’s husband, farmer Kyle Flack, and Wurzrainer will be at the Pantry to answer questions about the produce or the prepared meals.

“I think the hope for the event at the end is for people to see how good stuff can taste,” Flack said.

“If it’s prepared right, it doesn’t have to be super complicated.”

Restaurant owner and chef Andreas Wurzrainer, of Christopher’s on Whidbey, will prepare special dishes with produce from Bell’s Farm for Whidbey Island Grown Week, which aims to promote local businesses, farms and products. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

Restaurant owner and chef Andreas Wurzrainer, of Christopher’s on Whidbey, will prepare special dishes with produce from Bell’s Farm for Whidbey Island Grown Week, which aims to promote local businesses, farms and products. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

John Burks, owner of Kettle’s Edge Farm, looks at some of the peppers that will be featured in cooking demonstrations by a local food blogger. The farm will be one of nine on the self-guided Ebey’s Farm Tour from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sept. 29. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

John Burks, owner of Kettle’s Edge Farm, looks at some of the peppers that will be featured in cooking demonstrations by a local food blogger. The farm will be one of nine on the self-guided Ebey’s Farm Tour from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sept. 29. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

John Burks, owner of Kettle’s Edge Farm, holds a couple heirloom tomatoes that will be featured in cooking demonstrations by a local food blogger during the Ebey’s Farm Tour from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sept. 29. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

John Burks, owner of Kettle’s Edge Farm, holds a couple heirloom tomatoes that will be featured in cooking demonstrations by a local food blogger during the Ebey’s Farm Tour from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sept. 29. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

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