Sewage plant recognized as project of the year

Oak Harbor’s new clean water facility was recently honored as one of the “projects of the year” by the American Public Works Association.

The organization found that the sewage treatment plant is the best in the nation under the environmental category for projects over $74 million. The city was recognized during the American Public Works Association’s Public Works Expo in Seattle last week.

A press release from the organization stresses that a large number of people, groups and agencies were involved in building the $149-million facility. The work to replace the city’s aging sewage treatment facilities began in 2010.

“The Clean Water Facility is the culmination of forged partnerships,” Mayor Bob Severns said in a statement. “Putting it mildly, it was a team effort between federal regulators, Olympia lawmakers, local decision-makers, city staff, local and regional technical and contractor expertise, and Oak Harbor community.”

Community members participated in numerous meetings to select the facility’s location and decision. More than 175 regional and local contractors worked to build the plant, the press release states.

The facility’s membrane bioreactor system is state of the art and discharges crystal-clear water.

The award recognizes “infrastructure projects publicly developed, owned, and maintained, that promote excellence in construction management and administration. These awards recognize the alliance between the managing agency, the contractor, the consultant, and their cooperative achievements.”

The American Public Works Association serves professionals in all aspects of public works. With a worldwide membership more than 30,000 strong, APWA includes not only personnel from government agencies but also private sector personnel who supply products and services to those professionals.

More in News

Little Oaks Preschool (Karina Andrew/Whidbey News-Times)
Cost, accessibility of child care raises concerns on Whidbey

The high cost and sparse availability of child care are serious public health challenges on Whidbey.

County commissioners rescind COVID bonuses

Money will likely still be coming to county employees, just in a different form.

Photo by Emily Gilbert
Suicides at bridge renew interest in nets

Recent deaths at the Deception Pass Bridge have renewed calls for barriers to prevent more suicides.

Murderer of deputies continues appeals pro se

A man who killed two deputies 34 years ago is still trying to appeal his murder convictions.

Former county commissioner diagnosed with case of breakthrough COVID-19

Helen Price Johnson is crediting the vaccine for how mild her case has been.

Brian Read
Eviction lawyer booked into jail weeks after his disbarment

Brian Read, 45, of Freeland, pleaded guilty Monday to vehicular assault while under the influence.

Traffic, utility rate studies planned for city of Langley

Langley will participate in studies on speeding on Sixth Street and affordability of utility rates.

Maureen Greene displays a sign and distributes informational papers opposing the Black Lives Matter banner at the June 11 protest. (Photo by Karina Andrew/Whidbey News-Times)
School board member threatens to sue students

Damian Greene is threatening legal action against students for an online post he claims is libelous.

Oak Harbor man sent to prison for assault of mother, ex-wife

An Oak Harbor man threatened to shoot his mother and ex-wife and hit his ex-wife twice with his car.

Most Read