OH property owners won’t feel tax relief for a couple of years

Education levy lid won’t bring tax relief until 2019

The education levy lid passed with the state budget earlier this year won’t bring tax relief until 2019.

In fact, owners of a $200,000 home will pay at least $674 in 2018 property taxes to fund public education.

Oak Harbor Public Schools will be able to collect $2.55 per thousand dollars of assessed property value during 2018 because of a measure passed in a recent levy election. Complicating matters, the state’s general education levy — set at a rate of 82 cents per thousand in 2018 — comes due as well.

“In the calendar year 2018, local taxpayers will pay the $2.55 of the local levy — and this is true in every district — plus the new state levy they are adding,” said Lance Gibbon, superintendent of Oak Harbor Public Schools.

“So they’ll be paying $3.37 per thousand in 2018.”

Come 2019, however, the local levy portion of that bill will be reduced to $1.50 per thousand.

At the Aug. 14 school board meeting, Gibbon said the idea behind the $1.50 lid was that by limiting local tax-burden, the state would step up and supplement the local levies by funding areas of basic education — those areas ruled under-funded by Olympia in the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision.

But this system is far from perfect, Gibbon said.

Even with the $1.50 lid, more affluent districts will still be able to collect more money in the long haul if their properties have higher value than in poorer areas.

Yet Gibbon remains thankful for the additional state funding the district will receive.

“In fairness, I think we should be thankful for what we are getting because there are new resources,” Gibbon said.

“We are going to have to see how these things shake out for us as a district.”

More in News

Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times
Oak Harbor Garry Oak Society President Laura Renninger, seen here with group mascot Garry, said she hopes Oak Harbor residents appreciate the city’s unique namesake trees this year.
City’s mayor proclaims 2021 as ‘Year of the Oak’

Members of the Oak Harbor Garry Oak Society hope residents will take advantage of a few opportunities to celebrate the city’s namesake tree.

Federal judge rejects injunction request against Navy Growlers

The decision wasn’t a surprise, and it doesn’t directly affect the underlying lawsuits by the state Attorney General’s Office and COER.

Schools look for more diversity in hiring teachers

Despite 41.9 percent of the Oak Harbor student population identifying as an ethnicity other than white, only 7.9 percent of teachers identified as an ethnicity other than white.

Teachers starting to receive COVID-19 vaccines

Gov. Inslee made the group immediately eligible along with those already in Phase 1B1 of the state’s vaccination program.

Hospital renovation moving forward

The $22.5 million project is on on track despite the district’s “cash poor” status and the pandemic.

Coupeville Middle School students are returning to campus, but not for class

Students in grades 6-8 will return to campus on March 8 in the afternoons for two days a week.

Camano man accused of murder appears in court

The man was accused of shooting two people, killing one, at a Camano Island home on Feb. 28.

House passes ban on certain police use-of-force tactics

Chokeholds are prohibited, car are chases limited and military equipment is not allowed.

Most Read