Land Trust unveils new interactive map

  • Tuesday, January 30, 2018 1:20pm
  • News

If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to get outdoors and enjoy nature, the Whidbey Camano Land Trust has created a new tool that might provide some inspiration.

The Land Trust has produced a new interactive map on its website that shows more than 20 properties protected by the Land Trust that people can visit and stretch their legs on.

Go to hwww.wclt.org/interactive-map/

The map features interactive tools to search a variety of options, such as property name, trail length and permitted activities, which include walking, birding, horseback riding or biking. Directions to each of these properties is provided.

The map also reveals the greater scope of land protection orchestrated by the Land Trust, with clusters of dots spanning both Camano and Whidbey islands. Brief descriptions are provided of each protected property.

The Land Trust has permanently protected nearly 9,100 acres of lands and waters in Island County. Protection of more than 8,500 of those acres has happened since 2003 when the nonprofit group shifted from an all-volunteer organization to a professional staff.

“The interactive WCLT property map is outstanding,” said Gloria Koll, a 14-year veteran on the early Land Trust board of directors. “How great for folks to be able to locate these properties and walking opportunities —and then have a map for finding the best way to get to each one.”

The interactive map is designed to showcase the work of the Land Trust and be a useful tool to outdoor enthusiasts interested in getting out on the lands that have public access.

The map will continue to improve, so make sure to check back.

The next phase of the project is to create custom pages for each of the protected areas to share more about the protection, restoration activities and public access updates.

New trail maps are also being created that will have direct links from the map.

The Whidbey Camano Land Trust is a nonprofit organization that actively involves the community in protecting, restoring and appreciating the important natural habitats and resource lands that support the diversity of life on the islands and in the waters of Puget Sound.

For more information, visit www.wclt.org, email info@wclt.org or call 360.222.3310.

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