Poisoning cases reported on South Whidbey

Four people on South Whidbey were left in critical condition “in the last week” after accidentally poisoning themselves, according to South Whidbey Fire/EMS Deputy Chief Wendy Moffatt.

Moffatt said the latest update the fire district received from hospitals indicated the patients would recover.

Details are unclear due to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA, which protects patient privacy. Moffatt confirmed the victims are South Whidbey residents, but wouldn’t say where on the island.

“They were critical patients, yet are all hopeful to make a full recovery now,” Moffatt said.

“In the last week, we almost lost four people because they ate something they did not recognize was dangerous.”

Two adults accidentally poisoned themselves by eating mushrooms picked on their property. Moffatt said the adults could be described as mushroom experts who had foraged fungi on their property for years.

It is unclear if the adult victims were foraging for edible mushrooms, or psilocybe mushrooms, known for their psychedelic properties.

They’re also known as “magic mushrooms.”

In an unrelated case, two children “under the age of five” became critically ill after ingesting horse medicine. She said the two children got into “foil-wrapped medication” in their home.

It is unclear what the medication was, but it led Palmer to urge caution in the home when storing medications.

“Accidental overdose of any medicine is possible,” Palmer said. “We see it in our older population often when they take meds and take it again because they forgot. I can only ask people to be careful with their medications, especially if kids are around.”

Palmer also warns that some mushrooms can be deadly.

“People need to be really careful,” Chief Rusty Palmer said. “When it comes to mushrooms, people need to be abundantly sure that they know what they’re doing. I don’t know much about them, but there are some that look like other safe and edible kinds of mushrooms.”

More in News

Lt. j.g. William McIlvaine, left, celebrates after graduating from flight school. He was killed in a training accident in March 2013. His uncle, Phelps McIlvaine, donated a monument to Oak Harbor in honor of all service members who died while serving in Prowler squadrons. Photo courtesy Phelps McIlvaine
Prowler aircraft monument still in works years later

The Oak Harbor Park Board learned the donated monument will probably be installed this year.

Woman sues Uber over injury suffered in 2018

The woman is suing the car-for-hire company over an injury that occurred in Oak Harbor in 2018.

Legislature opens with call for cooperation on COVID-19 relief

The state legislature launched its virtual session this week.

Low-cost crab pots available at fundraiser Jan. 17

The Deception Pass Sail and Power Squadron is offering crab pots with… Continue reading

Oak Harbor council decides on marina environmental restoration plan

The boat ramp will be getting a makeover, but no pocket beach is planned for Catalina Park.

The Tokitae ferry pulls into the new Mukilteo ferry terminal Thursday afternoon. Photo by Kira Erickson/Whidbey News Group
State ferries ridership reaches a 50-year low

Total ridership in 2020 was about 14 million, or 41 percent, less than the 10 million in 2019.

A tree on Highway 20 on the north side of the Deception Pass bridge held up traffic until it could be cleared early on Wednesday, Jan. 13. Photo by China Hageman
Windstorm wreaks havoc across island

Power was knocked out to thousands of customers in the first big storm of the year.

State health officer temporarily helping county

Dr. Lindquist has been serving on an emergency basis since Dec. 31 and will continue until Jan. 20.

Firefighter Jeff Rhodes (left), Firefighter Keith Dawson (center, back), Acting Lieutenant Alex Majestic (right) practice a CPR response without the LUCAS 3 Chest Compression System the agency wants to buy. Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times
District turns to crowdfunding for CPR tool

Central Whidbey Island Fire and Rescue is looking to raise $18,580 to buy a CPR tool.

Most Read