Coupeville Lions Club prepping for annual garage sale

Photo by Maria Matson /Whidbey News Group.
                                Coupeville Lions garage sale chairman Brian Pulk stands among piles of merchandise the club has collected in advance of their annual garage sale.

Photo by Maria Matson /Whidbey News Group. Coupeville Lions garage sale chairman Brian Pulk stands among piles of merchandise the club has collected in advance of their annual garage sale.

The piles of furniture, lamps, toys and games pile high above Brian Pulk’s head as he stands in a barn packed to the brim with all types of merchandise. It will take a big effort to eventually move all these items, but it’s an effort worth taking for the Coupeville Lion’s Club.

The club is gearing up for its massive annual garage sale, an event that is expected to attract hundreds of locals in search of a good deal.

Although the sale is at a new location this year, the Coupeville Middle School, expect to find the same good deals and wide variety of items this year. The sale will be 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., June 30 and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 1. The preview will be noon to 6 p.m. on June 29.

The garage sale is usually held at the Coupeville Elementary School, but this year the school is undergoing construction.

“The day before the garage sale, from noon to 6 (p.m.), we let the public in to look at everything,” said Deanna Rogers, public relations chairwoman for the Coupeville Lions Club. “They can look at it, and don’t touch, and when they come back on Saturday they can dash for it.”

This mad rush for bargains has now been going on 39 years, and the Coupeville Lion’s Club uses the proceeds to give back to the community, according to Pulk, who is the garage sale chairman.

Last year, the club earned about $50,000, Pulk said.

“Most of the money that we take in goes to local non-profits,” he said.

This year, the donated items take up enough space to fill three barns.

What type of items do they have, some might ask?

“A lot of furniture, some bicycles, lawn mowers, tools, glassware, china, just a wide range of stuff,” Pulk said. “This year, for the second year, we are selling plants.”

Also for sale will be sporting goods, books, games, children’s toys, collectibles and exercise equipment. This year, a truck, a tan 2000 Isuzu Hombre, will be up for sale.

It takes about 100 volunteers to run the event, which generally brings in 300 to 400 visitors, Pulk said.

“All year long we do pickups from people in the community who are donating items,” he said.

Pulk said the actual event takes about two weeks to prepare, from getting the merchandise to the school gym and grounds to the tedious job of pricing the items.

He said he’s looking forward to the big sale being over.

“It’s a lot of fun, and it’s a lot of work,” Pulk said.

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