County changes conservation grants evaluation process

The Board of Island County Commissioners decided to change the scoring process of applications for the conservation futures program during a recent work session meeting.

The grant can be used to purchase land for preservation of threatened areas of open space, such as timber lands, wetlands, habitat areas, agricultural farmlands and more.

Under the current process, the Citizens Advisory Board ranks applications based on numerical scores from each member. The new process will eliminate numerical scoring, and the advisory board will only submit a narrative evaluation to the commissioners.

The commissioners would also receive separate evaluations from the Department of Natural Resources and county Planning Department.

“The reality is that people are using subjective opinions to get to their indisputable numbers, so that’s where I’m more supportive of the narrative,” said Commissioner Jill Johnson. “I’d rather have the thought process shown than just the number, where I can’t see how they reached it.”

Commissioner Rick Hannold said he agrees, but Commissioner Helen Price Johnson said she believes the numbers made the process more simple.

The commissioners also opted to remove the funding priorities from the application.

These priorities were originally given to serve as a communication tool for applicants to help them understand which projects the commissioners would consider most important, said Elaine Marlow, director of General Services Administration, which oversees the program.

During the meeting, commissioners Hannold and Johnson pointed out the importance of being clear about their priorities.

“In my mind, it feels only fair to say what these priorities are upfront,” said Johnson.

However, Price Johnson said the criteria given in the application makes it clear enough what the goals of the program are. Hannold and Johnson said they would give precedence to sites for stormwater drainage and shoreline access and Price Johnson included resource lands and farmland in her list of priorities.

“I would suggest that if people are considering applying that they do outreach to individual commissioners to make sure they know what we’re thinking, so that they know,” said Johnson.

These changes will be in effect for the upcoming 2018 application process.

More in News

A chance to get to know the Captain Whidbey, new owners

Over a century old and a central Whidbey landmark, the Captain Whidbey… Continue reading

New education, training program for juvenile court

Island County Juvenile Court will soon start a pilot program aimed at… Continue reading

Naval search and rescue team rescues two people from Cascade Mountains

A Search and Rescue (SAR) team from Naval Air Station (NAS) Whidbey… Continue reading

Expert: Chief followed protocol

David Marks’ arrest of suspect ‘exactly what we teach’

Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times.
                                Donovan McCulley cheers at the end of the commencement ceremony Saturday.
Oak Harbor grads show ‘inspirational ambition’

Oak Harbor High School’s class of 2018 reached graduation through four years… Continue reading

Power outage planned for Thursday in Coupeville

About 900 Puget Sound Energy customers in Coupeville will be left in… Continue reading

Marc Gallaway
Oak Harbor grad earns state Principal of the Year honor

Marc Gallaway, a 1988 graduate of Oak Harbor High School and currently… Continue reading

Survey shows mostly positive impression of rural events

Though public hearings on the issue have often been contentious on both… Continue reading

Port executive director gets raise

The Port of Coupeville Executive Director is receiving a pay raise. Chris… Continue reading

Most Read