The cadet cadre of Cascade Falcon XXIV practiced military formations as they prepared for the arrival of students June 30. (CAP Photo by Lt Col Tim Kelley, Cascade Falcon XXIV Public Affairs Officer)

The cadet cadre of Cascade Falcon XXIV practiced military formations as they prepared for the arrival of students June 30. (CAP Photo by Lt Col Tim Kelley, Cascade Falcon XXIV Public Affairs Officer)

Cascade Falcon XXIV held at Camp Casey

Civil Air Patrol members from around Washington state and beyond arrived at Camp Casey for the Cascade Falcon XXIV summer encampment.

It’s the fourth year in a row for Washington to hold the annual encampment in Coupeville.

Training close to 140 cadet students is the focus of the 10-day event.

The senior or “adult” staff and cadet or “teenage” cadre arrived June 27 to prepare for the start of training on June 30.

Activities included classroom sessions on Civil Air Patrol and U.S. Air Force topics and leadership principles and taking part in hands-on aerospace education activities.

In addition, cadets train in drill, ceremonies and physical fitness and undergo inspections of their uniforms and living areas.

During the week, cadets were introduced to future careers with behind the scenes tours of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island and visits by guest instructors from the Washington National Guard.

New to Cascade Falcon this year was an Advanced Training Squadron, which will provide advanced leadership training to cadets that will prepare them for future leadership roles in the Civil Air Patrol and beyond.

“Cascade Falcon has a hard-earned reputation as one of the best encampments in the nation” said Major Scott Dean, encampment commander.

Dean is also the commander of the South Sound Composite Squadron located near Olympia.

Civil Air Patrol members from across Washington, Oregon and from as far away as Montana worked for more than six months planning the event.

The week of training will concludes only July 6 with a Pass in Review for parents, friends and family.

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