A lamb playfully nudges Kyle Flack at Bell’s Farm. (Photos by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times)

A lamb playfully nudges Kyle Flack at Bell’s Farm. (Photos by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times)

Spring into action

  • Tuesday, March 19, 2019 3:27pm
  • Life

The snow has melted, the sun is out and noses are sniffling as they inhale the newly spawned allergens floating in the air. March 20 marks the first official day of spring this year in the Northern Hemisphere.

So far, it’s come in more like a lamb than a lion— fingers crossed.

The days leading to spring’s start recorded highs of 65. Flowers are blooming and new calves are mooing. Rainy days are certain to come, but that only means greener grass and more plentiful gardens.

Although the winter was a bit harsher, and whiter, than usual, livestock are thriving. Central Whidbey’s Bell’s Farm and Bailey Farm both reported early arrivals of lambs and calves respectively. Tiny fuzzy bunnies and puny peeping chicks have also been seen bouncing and flapping around Willowood Farm.

Even more baby animals are expected any day.

A calf gnaws on hay with the older cows, despite being not old enough to actually eat it.

A calf gnaws on hay with the older cows, despite being not old enough to actually eat it.

Kyle Flack holds Mussels, born during Musselfest weekend. The lamb was the Bell’s Farm’s latest addition at the time.

Kyle Flack holds Mussels, born during Musselfest weekend. The lamb was the Bell’s Farm’s latest addition at the time.

Georgie Smith holds two French angora rabbits at Willowood Farm of Ebey’s Prairie. The bunnies were only about 3-weeks old.

Georgie Smith holds two French angora rabbits at Willowood Farm of Ebey’s Prairie. The bunnies were only about 3-weeks old.

A ruby-eyed white French Angora baby bunny peeks out from its enclosure at Willowood Farm.

A ruby-eyed white French Angora baby bunny peeks out from its enclosure at Willowood Farm.

Chicks that just barely grew their wing feathers scramble over each other to get some food at Willowood Farm.

Chicks that just barely grew their wing feathers scramble over each other to get some food at Willowood Farm.

One of the several new lambs at Bell’s Farm struts around the field on a sunny day.

One of the several new lambs at Bell’s Farm struts around the field on a sunny day.

A calf sticks its tongue out hoping to get a taste of some hay at Bailey Farm.

A calf sticks its tongue out hoping to get a taste of some hay at Bailey Farm.

More in Life

Garden show blooms with bucks for Whidbey artisans

Bob Bowling hopes to earn half of his annual income in the… Continue reading

Future is crystal clear for young business owner

A young Freeland entrepreneur is defying stereotypes about a younger generation that… Continue reading

New owner aims to realize restaurant’s potential

When Jennifer Hua became the new owner of the Hong Kong Gardens… Continue reading

Give nature a hand on Saturdays this spring

By Ron Newberry Special to the News-Times Springtime kicks off the season… Continue reading

Oak Harbor’s ‘go-to guy’ retiring after 44 years

During the last snow storm, the man behind the wheel of a… Continue reading

Record number seeking roles in Shakespeare Festival

Three plays, 46 performances and 147 days until opening night.And 218 actors… Continue reading

Whidbey couple wins $50,000 in state lottery

So many things could have gone differently the day Betsy and Amir… Continue reading

South Whidbey fisherman takes up a new type of tackle

South Whidbey resident John Norris is hunting for treasure. But he isn’t… Continue reading

Coupeville teacher takes a novel approach to Holocaust lesson planning

Coupeville eighth grader Jones Walther recognizes that it’s easy to remove oneself… Continue reading

Most Read