Riders pedal next to farmland near Crockett Lake during the Whidbey Camano Land Trust’s 2018 Sea, Trees Pie Bike Ride. Photo provided

Riders pedal next to farmland near Crockett Lake during the Whidbey Camano Land Trust’s 2018 Sea, Trees Pie Bike Ride. Photo provided

Sea, Trees Pie ride offers a slice of natural beauty

  • Tuesday, May 14, 2019 7:41pm
  • Life

It’s one thing to take in the sights of scenic Central Whidbey Island from inside a vehicle. It’s quite another to soak in all the natural beauty, breathe the sea air, and listen and watch for wildlife from the seat of a bicycle.

The fourth annual Sea, Trees & Pie Bike Ride appeals to all of these senses as well as one more that makes this event unique: Cyclists are treated to a delicious slice of pie after their ride.

The Bike Ride is on Sunday, July 21, starting at 10 a.m. It’s a non-competitive event for riders of all skill levels. Participants may choose from three scenic routes consisting of 5, 10 or 20-mile loops. The 5-mile loop is over fairly level ground and is designed for both beginning and young bike riders.

This annual bike ride is organized by the Whidbey Camano Land Trust, a nonprofit nature conservation organization that protects natural areas and working farms and provides public access to beaches and trails. Event proceeds will continue the Land Trust’s conservation work on the islands.

Taking place in Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, the bike ride showcases more than 30 properties permanently protected by the Land Trust.

Crockett Lake, the island’s largest wetland system, is a prominent natural feature along all three routes. Participants will enjoy riding through some of the island’s most breathtaking landscapes, including farmlands, beaches, wetlands, and woods with incredible views of the Olympic Mountains and Puget Sound.

Early registration is $30 per adult and $15 per child (ages 6-16) and ends at noon on July 16. Late registration is open until noon on July 19. There is no registration on the day of the event. Helmets are required for all riders. Child riders under the age of 6 will not be allowed.

The start and finish lines for all three routes is at the State Parks birding platform near the Coupeville/Port Townsend ferry terminal. A Discover Pass is required to park there.

At the end of the ride, participants receive a slice of pie generously donated by event sponsor Whidbey Pies. Other event sponsors include Skagit Cycle, Bayview Bicycles, Island Athletic Club, Mainspring Wealth Advisors, Penn Cove Taproom and Prairie Center Red Apple Market.

The Whidbey Camano Land Trust is a nonprofit nature conservation organization that actively involves the community in protecting, restoring and appreciating the important natural habitats and resource lands that support the diversity of life on our islands and in the waters of Puget Sound.

For more information, visit http://www.wclt.org/, email info@wclt.org, or call 360-222-3310.

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