Baker Stefanie Stuchell lifts a tray of gougeres, cheese-filled pastries, from the oven. She is one of the five bakers for Salt Sea Provisions. Photo by Kira Erickson/Whidbey News-Times

Baker Stefanie Stuchell lifts a tray of gougeres, cheese-filled pastries, from the oven. She is one of the five bakers for Salt Sea Provisions. Photo by Kira Erickson/Whidbey News-Times

Pop-up shop carrying bakery items opens in Langley

The pop-up is a collaboration between several Langley businesses.

A new pop-up shopping experience has opened on South Whidbey, with products from familiar names.

Salt & Sea Provisions is a collaboration of the Langley businesses Prima Bistro, Saltwater Fish House & Oyster Bar and Seabiscuit Bakery, all owned by Jenn and Sieb Jurriaans.

Its opening aims to highlight goods from Seabiscuit Bakery, the newest of the three businesses, and give the bakery a recognizable storefront.

Salt & Sea Provisions makes use of the Saltwater Fish House & Oyster Bar space at 113 First St. during morning hours before the restaurant’s opening. Customers will find baguettes, croissants, pot pies, cookies and brownies, as well as bottled wine and beer, cocktail kits, pâté and chicken liver mousse, salad and clam chowder.

“So many people are looking to pop in and grab something and go back home,” Jenn Jurriaans said.

She said nothing is changing with Saltwater Fish House & Oyster Bar. The restaurant will maintain its normal hours.

The presence of a bakery helps fulfill a demand in the Langley downtown, she said.

“Just as I was constantly being told that we needed to open a seafood restaurant, the bakery is a hole that is very clear in town,” she said.

Salt & Sea Provisions opened Sept. 18. Its opening weekend saw lines of locals down the block, and some items sold out within an hour of opening.

“It was bonkers,” said Jurriaans.

The pop-up shop is intended as a temporary home for Seabiscuit Bakery’s products. The couple would like to find a permanent home for the bakery, she said.

Currently, the baked goods take over the bar area of Saltwater Fish House & Oyster Bar. Jurriaans said it is quite the transition to see.

She said head pastry chef Allyss Taylor and five other bakers who work in a small building behind Saltwater are the unsung heroes of the operation.

Taylor, Jurriaans said, “is a magician in figuring out how to keep track of all these online orders and huge production for both restaurants and now this pop-up.”

Salt & Sea Provisions is open 9 a.m. to noon, Friday through Sunday.

More in Life

Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record
If looks could kilt: Whidbey club celebrates Scottish garb

More than four dozen lads and lasses from South Whidbey are part of the Rampant Kilt Society.

Photo by Kira Erickson
In the trees: Couple takes Whidbey Island vacation rental to new heights

Max Lindsay-Thorsen and Tatiana Rocha always knew they wanted to build treehouses.

Photo by Kira Erickson
Whidbey Island Fair returns

Visitors gather to take their turns on carnival rides and watch beloved 4-H animals compete.

Adrienne Lyle (Photo provided)
Whidbey Islander will compete in Tokyo Olympics

Adrienne Lyle and her horse, Salvino, set two American records in their Olympic qualifying events.

Queen Patsy Arthur and her court in the 1956 Fair Parade.
Decades of fair memories saved by South Whidbey Historical Society

Thousands of pages digitized and free to view online

Kids decorate cookies at the 2019 Whidbey Island Fair. (Photo provided)
Cookie decorating returning to Whidbey fair

More than 500 people stopped by for a creative and delicious treat at the 2019 fair.

Whidbey Island Fair makes return after year off

A beloved tradition that took a hiatus in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic is back this year.

Photo by Kira Erickson
Gary Gabelein, this year's grand marshal of the Whidbey Island Fair parade, with his donkey, Cleopatra.
Longtime fair volunteer, community member chosen as this year’s grand marshal

Gary Gabelein has a long history of involvement with the Whidbey Island Fair.

Becca Heavrin paints in her studio. (Photo by Karina Andrew/Whidbey News-Times)
New resident sets up her art studio in Greenbank

F or Becca Heavrin, creating art is a process of discovery.

Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times
Mark Saia points to a repair on the Suva's NAME OF EQUIPMENT
Suva returns to the water after undergoing repairs

The 95-year-old wooden sailboat spent the last month in dry dock to replace its horn timber.

Pacific Northwest Art School founder Muriel Pickard (Photo provided)
Pacific Northwest Art School recipient of legacy gifts

During their lifetimes, Muriel Pickard and Ellen Marott gave much more than money to the art school.

Photo by Kira Erickson
Kayla Bodenhafer, 15, with Kenny, a goat who broke his leg and avoided a death sentence earlier this year. The Bodenhafers refused to put him down and instead made him a cast. In years past, he has been at the Whidbey Island Fair.
Goats with success stories — and more — at Whidbey fair

Goats who miraculously recovered from injury and illness will compete at the upcoming fair.