Photo provided
                                Bracelets, necklaces, barrettes and rings are just some of the different types of jewelry that can be made with botanical materials.

Photo provided Bracelets, necklaces, barrettes and rings are just some of the different types of jewelry that can be made with botanical materials.

Jewelery workshop set for April 10

Nature lovers will have a chance to create their very own jewelry from their favorite plants this spring.

South Whidbey Parks and Recreation will hold a botanical jewelry workshop, where participants will make rings, bracelets, barrettes or pins using succulents and florets.

“Amateur floral aficionado” and Recreation Supervisor Carrie Monforte will be leading the class.

She has spent the past few years practicing the craft, crediting Whidbey wedding planner and floral artist Tobey Nelson with teaching her how to make the jewelry.

“It’s definitely temporary art,” Monforte said.

“Just the process is fun.”

Monforte has taught a few other classes on the subject, but this will be her first time directing it for the parks and recreation department.

A mixture of moss and floral adhesive attach the succulents and florets to the metal base of the jewelry.

The main thing, she said, is that the elements are on a small scale.

A piece of botanical jewelry can last from a few days to a few weeks, depending on which plants are used.

“If you’re using dried elements, it will last as long as you treat it good for a long time,” Monforte said.

The class will take place 3-4:30 p.m. on Friday, April 10 in Room 111 of the parks and recreation building.

Refreshments will be provided. The cost to attend is $45, which includes cost of materials, and participants must register online at http://swparks.org/event/botanical-jewelry/. Space is limited to 10 people.

If the demand is present, Monforte said she is considering holding a second class this year around Mother’s Day, for people to make gifts or to bring their mother to experience the workshop.

“One of the great outcomes of this kind of workshop is seeing how different each person’s work turns out, all lovely, but you see folks’ personality come through,” she said.

Photo provided
                                Lola Monforte, Carrie’s daughter, displays a botanical barrette in her hair.

Photo provided Lola Monforte, Carrie’s daughter, displays a botanical barrette in her hair.

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