Festival association awards $31K in community grants

The Coupeville Festival Association awarded more than $31,000 in community grants last week to 10 organizations.

Several of this year’s grants went to projects aimed at building or renovating infrastructure for some of the organizations.

The Island County Historical Museum received money to help fund a major renovation.

“The main exhibit hasn’t changed in the last several years,” said Museum Director Rick Castellano, adding this is primarily because of the museum’s current display cases.

The museum has been working with the Central Whidbey Lions Club to design new cases that can stand alone or be linked together and sealed to protect artifacts from humidity and dust, Castellano said.

The Pacific Northwest Art School received CFA funds to purchase infrastructure to support classroom instruction.

Art school Director Lisa Bernhardt said the grant will go toward purchasing items such as tables and a portable demonstration mirror.

The Pacific Rim Institute, located south of Coupeville, received a grant to create and install educational signs and displays.

The Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association and Coupeville Chamber of Commerce received money for hanging flower baskets and decorations.

The Coupeville Garden Club was awarded a grant to renovate Captain Coupe’s Garden with new plants and an irrigation system.

The festival association awarded grants to help fund cultural and art activities in town, which will include the hiring of two professional presenters for children’s programs to the Coupeville Library; a Memorial Parade and program; three free Saratoga Orchestra concerts; and youth activities during the Penn Cove Water Festival.

Money for the community grants is generated each year from the Coupeville Art and Crafts Festival.

As a result of the 2016 festival, the association will donate $47,000 back into the community, Dessert said.

Grant requests are evaluated by the association on how well they meet goals for promoting quality handcrafts and the arts; ensuring the cultural enrichment of residents within the 98239 zip code; and beautifying and preserving Coupeville’s historical qualities.

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