Veronica Crownover, Jakobi Baumann and Nikolai Lyngra stand at the graduation ceremony as the class is welcomed. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

Veronica Crownover, Jakobi Baumann and Nikolai Lyngra stand at the graduation ceremony as the class is welcomed. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

Coupeville’s 2019 graduates receive diplomas, look ahead to the future

Four years. Four years of homework, friendships, classrooms lectures, competitions and the inevitable hijinks. It came to a close Friday for the 64 students who graduated Coupeville High School.

High school is over for them, but they have big plans for the future.

Some will be attending universities, music schools, veterinary schools or joining the military. Others are on track to be the nurses, underwater welders, aviation mechanics, therapists and teachers of the future.

Together, they received more than $321,900 in scholarships.

The members of the class formed friendships and bonds as only small-town kids can, a theme which came up time and time again in the speeches at Friday evening’s graduation ceremony.

The Coupeville middle and high school bands welcomed the seniors to the ceremony with the traditional rendition of “Pomp and Circumstance” as the graduates entered the gymnasium though a balloon-covered arch and took their seats for the evening.

After the national anthem, the senior class president Peytin Vondrak welcomed attendees.

Salutatorian Harris Sinclair and Valedictorian Sarah Wright spoke of the values that have defined their high school careers, including hard work, determination and passion.

Senior music performances included “America the Beautiful” performed by Nikolai Lyngra on guitar and “The Chicken.”

“I’ve learned there are two kinds of people. People who return their shopping carts and those who don’t,” faculty speaker and history teacher Brad Sherman said, prompting laughs from the audience.

It’s about behaving in good character, even when no one is watching, he said. The seniors’ years were filled with long days and early mornings, and their work has paid off.

“The hard part is perseverance,” he said. But that is what determines future success, he said.

A senior slide show elicited cheers and clapping for baby pictures, candid moments and senior photo shoots.

After diplomas were handed out to every senior, the graduates turned their tassels and tossed their hats high.

For graduate Matt Stevens, the end of his high school career is a cause for celebration, but he isn’t leaving without looking back.

“I feel super good, Stevens said. “I’ll probably miss it a bit.”

“Congratulations, class of 2019,” Superintendent Steve King said as he addressed the beaming graduates and their proud families for the final time.

Seniors, including smiling graduate Jaushon Clay, center, line up before entering the gymnasium Friday evening. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

Seniors, including smiling graduate Jaushon Clay, center, line up before entering the gymnasium Friday evening. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

It’s hugs, tears and cheers for the graduating class as they enter their new lives post-high school. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

It’s hugs, tears and cheers for the graduating class as they enter their new lives post-high school. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

Jaschon Baumann hugs his friend. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

Jaschon Baumann hugs his friend. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

Madison Rixe, left, and Tamika Nastali make “hand hearts” to friends and family. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

Madison Rixe, left, and Tamika Nastali make “hand hearts” to friends and family. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

Bruna Moratori and her family smile for photos after the ceremony. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

Bruna Moratori and her family smile for photos after the ceremony. Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times

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