Cookie decorating returning to Whidbey fair

More than 500 people stopped by for a creative and delicious treat at the 2019 fair.

Kids decorate cookies at the 2019 Whidbey Island Fair. (Photo provided)

Kids decorate cookies at the 2019 Whidbey Island Fair. (Photo provided)

Free cookie decorating is returning to the Whidbey Island Fair after its successful 2019 debut.

In the baking department, where baked goods contests are administered, fair-goers of any age can stop in and decorate a cookie to keep. Fair baking superintendent Debbie Neely said upwards of 500 people stopped by for a creative and delicious treat at the 2019 fair.

Adding cookie decorating to the last fair was Neely’s idea.

“I wanted to do something educational,” she said, adding that people really enjoy hands-on activities, especially when the product is so tasty.

The first year cookie decorating was available, Neely, who has had years of prior professional cake decorating experience, shared some tips and tricks with one fair-goer, a nurse, who wanted to keep decorating at home. Later, the nurse emailed and thanked Neely for her help.

Though often overshadowed by traditional fair show-stealers such as animals, baking and other crafts are an integral part of the fair experience, Neely said.

Every year, the fair administers contests for a variety of baked goods, including breads, cookies, pies and other treats. All entries are awarded a blue, red or white ribbon, with top entries receiving additional prizes.

Neely said judging the baking contest is a hoot every year. With hundreds of contestants, even eating only small samples of each baked good leaves the judges unable to eat another bite by the end of the judging period.

“We’re laughing so hard by the end of it,” she said.

Prospective baking contestants should register online by July 13.

Kids decorate cookies at the 2019 Whidbey Island Fair. (Photo provided)

Kids decorate cookies at the 2019 Whidbey Island Fair. (Photo provided)

More in Life

Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record
If looks could kilt: Whidbey club celebrates Scottish garb

More than four dozen lads and lasses from South Whidbey are part of the Rampant Kilt Society.

Photo by Kira Erickson
In the trees: Couple takes Whidbey Island vacation rental to new heights

Max Lindsay-Thorsen and Tatiana Rocha always knew they wanted to build treehouses.

Photo by Kira Erickson
Whidbey Island Fair returns

Visitors gather to take their turns on carnival rides and watch beloved 4-H animals compete.

Adrienne Lyle (Photo provided)
Whidbey Islander will compete in Tokyo Olympics

Adrienne Lyle and her horse, Salvino, set two American records in their Olympic qualifying events.

Queen Patsy Arthur and her court in the 1956 Fair Parade.
Decades of fair memories saved by South Whidbey Historical Society

Thousands of pages digitized and free to view online

Kids decorate cookies at the 2019 Whidbey Island Fair. (Photo provided)
Cookie decorating returning to Whidbey fair

More than 500 people stopped by for a creative and delicious treat at the 2019 fair.

Whidbey Island Fair makes return after year off

A beloved tradition that took a hiatus in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic is back this year.

Photo by Kira Erickson
Gary Gabelein, this year's grand marshal of the Whidbey Island Fair parade, with his donkey, Cleopatra.
Longtime fair volunteer, community member chosen as this year’s grand marshal

Gary Gabelein has a long history of involvement with the Whidbey Island Fair.

Becca Heavrin paints in her studio. (Photo by Karina Andrew/Whidbey News-Times)
New resident sets up her art studio in Greenbank

F or Becca Heavrin, creating art is a process of discovery.

Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times
Mark Saia points to a repair on the Suva's NAME OF EQUIPMENT
Suva returns to the water after undergoing repairs

The 95-year-old wooden sailboat spent the last month in dry dock to replace its horn timber.

Pacific Northwest Art School founder Muriel Pickard (Photo provided)
Pacific Northwest Art School recipient of legacy gifts

During their lifetimes, Muriel Pickard and Ellen Marott gave much more than money to the art school.

Photo by Kira Erickson
Kayla Bodenhafer, 15, with Kenny, a goat who broke his leg and avoided a death sentence earlier this year. The Bodenhafers refused to put him down and instead made him a cast. In years past, he has been at the Whidbey Island Fair.
Goats with success stories — and more — at Whidbey fair

Goats who miraculously recovered from injury and illness will compete at the upcoming fair.