Whidbey Coffee releases bottled cold brew

Whidbey Coffee released its newest product this week, a bottled Beachcomber Cold Brew. Provided photo

Whidbey Coffee unveiled its newest enterprise this week, Beachbomber Cold Brew.

“It is my belief that Whidbey Coffee needs to remain relevant to the times and the ever changing marketplace,” said owner Dan Ollis.

“Take, for example, our new building on Pioneer Way, or even the new facility in Burlington. They all represent that (idea) of trying to remain an important part of everyday lives.”

“Our cold brew beverage is yet another example of the same.”

The bottled product is different than any other cold brew, or toddy, the company has served in the past, said Jeremy McDermott, who does sales and marketing for Whidbey Coffee.

McDermott spearheaded the project.

“We weren’t happy with what we’d been experiencing from bottled cold brew in the market,” he said.

Whidbey Coffee shops previously served a toddy cold brew that was made using the company’s Whidbey Blend, a bold roast.

McDermott said they found a Brazil and Rwanda blend they loved.

“It had the fruity, juicy refreshing qualities we love that we thought would be perfect for summer weather,” he said.

Creating the product took months of sampling to get roasting, ratios and bottling exactly how the Whidbey company wanted.

Cold brew is made in a very specific way and is more caffeinated than regular coffee.

McDermott said the product is brewed and bottled for Whidbey Coffee by a company in South Seattle.

The product’s release was intentionally started only in Whidbey Coffee cafés to allow baristas to introduce and explain the product to customers.

Ollis said it’s exciting to see the collaboration and process of his team bringing this product to the market.

“Their efforts and energy of bringing this to our customers has truly opened my eyes to what great people we have at Whidbey Coffee,” he said.

The beverage should soon be available in local grocery and wholesale outlets. The next phase of the release is figuring out how to deliver the product to those stores.

“It’s tricky because we have to keep it cold,” McDermott said. “But I anticipate being able to get it at store and wholesale locations sometime this summer.”

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