Marketing the power of oils

“I have an oil for that!” has become the slogan of Tracy Dietz, founder of Kissed By the Goddess, a home-based business that turns out custom-blended face cream, dry-skin cream, wrinkle cream, sugar scrubs, pain-easing ointments and salves, bath salts, roll-ons and lip balms.

Tracy Dietz

Tracy Dietz

“I have an oil for that!” has become the slogan of Tracy Dietz, founder of Kissed By the Goddess, a home-based business that turns out custom-blended face cream, dry-skin cream, wrinkle cream, sugar scrubs, pain-easing ointments and salves, bath salts, roll-ons and lip balms.

“Yeah, I say that a lot,” confessed Dietz, 47, who works full time as an insurance agent but would like to build her Oak Harbor business into full-time work.

“Oils can relax you, work as antiseptics, relieve congestion, soothe an upset stomach and ease pain in joints and ligaments. They penetrate the skin within 20 minutes.”

Dietz has been working with essential oils for 13 years and carries a dozen wherever she goes — among them, eucalyptus, lemon, peppermint, tea tree and “thieves,” a popular mixture of oils of cinnamon, clove, eucalyptus, lemon and rosemary.

“Thieves is antibacterial and anti-fungal,” she said. “I use it in hotel rooms.”

When working, she draws on a selection of 95 five-milliliter vials, all neatly contained in a specially made pack and worth about $2,000. If in doubt, she consults one of two 400-page tomes on oils. All her oils are naturally derived, not synthesized, she said.

Dietz said she mixes the oils into bases of almond oil, cocoa butter, coconut butter or shea butter.

All are applied topically; nothing is taken internally.

Though Dietz believes in power of oils, she is careful not to make any medical claims for her products.

“I tell people, ‘Here’s something that might help; try it and let me know if it works or not,’ ” she said. “I can’t say that it will heal them or that it works better than their prescriptions.”

“I can say it has made other people feel better.”

Dietz is happy to work with individuals to find the combination of oils that works best for them, taking detailed notes on each trial, she said.

Dietz said she worked for two years to find the optimal combination to ease a friend’s arthritis pain. Now, “she says it’s the most amazing thing she’s ever had,” Dietz said.

For the past two and-a-half years, Dietz built her business in creative ways. She maintains no website or Facebook page, but her online-games habit, plus her catch phrase, gained her customers in North Carolina, Oklahoma and Texas, she said.

Being married to a civilian Navy contractor helps her spread the word. Recently, Island Drug in Oak Harbor and Three Sisters Market in Coupeville agreed to carry some of her line.

Prices are more than reasonable, barely producing profit, Dietz conceded. “I don’t want to drive people away by setting them too high,” she said.

Two ounces of custom-blended pain-relieving cream costs $25, or $45 for four ounces. Sugar scrubs, designed to exfoliate, are $5 for four ounces. Some of those prices barely cover the cost of the oils involved, she said.

Once she gets the pricing right, “I can really do well at this,” she predicted.

“There are a lot of people who like the products.”

For information, email to tthymeservices@gmail.com.

 

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