Letters to the Editor

Levy: Renaissance begins in school

Kids need what the arts teach, and the upcoming school levy will continue to provide it. Art education is essential to the growth and development of the creative capabilities of all students. It has its roots in the discipline of visual communication and production, cultural and art history, judgment and aesthetics.

To a young child, it means learning how to apply concepts to communicate ideas. As a child learns to develop and use skills to solve problems, they are more successful in all areas of study. Students love to work with art materials and create products. Their work provides direct evidence of understanding and ability to apply basic concepts. Young children often need to learn kinesthetically to develop their understanding and memory.

Throughout human history, an appreciation of art, music, literature and science has been considered the hallmark of a well rounded citizen. I have taught elementary art for 20 years in the public schools. I work with elementary school students as they mature and graduate from very simple activities to very complex projects in six short years. They create and respond as they discover the world around them. Young children need and deserve a rich dimension to their education.

Thank you for supporting the upcoming school levy election this March. I know hundreds of students that are benefiting immeasurably from art education, physical education and the support staff who offer their expertise.

Nicolette Harrington

Elementary Art Specialist

Olympic View Elementary

Oak Harbor

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