Medical marijuana could be allowed on school grounds

  • Friday, January 11, 2019 10:45pm
  • News

By Madeline Coats

WNPA Olympia News Bureau

A bill proposed by Rep. Brian Blake, D-Aberdeen, would allow marijuana on school campuses for students who require aid for medical conditions.

HB 1060 aims to permit students to consume medical marijuana on school property, aboard buses and while attending school-sponsored events.

Students must meet the demands of state law RCW 69.51A.220, which requires that healthcare professionals must authorize the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Minors may receive treatment with the approval of their guardians.

According to the Legislator’s Guide to Washington’s Marijuana Laws, a qualifying medical condition is “severe enough to significantly interfere with the patient’s activities of daily living and ability to function.” Common disabilities or illnesses are cancer, epilepsy, anorexia, post-traumatic stress disorder and intractable pain.

A report from the Education Commission of the States, indicates that only Colorado, New Jersey, Maine and Washington state allow medical marijuana to be administered at schools. The bill in Washington would leave the decision whether to allow marijuana on campus for medical purposes up to local schools.

Rep. Blake filed HB 1060 at the request of a constituent whose daughter couldn’t receive treatment at school. He explained that the medical marijuana therapy was helping her function; however, she had to leave campus in order to use cannabis.

Under the proposed bill, the parent or guardian of a minor must be their designated provider and has control over their medical marijuana. As a result, the guardians would have to physically go to school in order to provide the substance to their child. To qualify, both the minor and the designated provider must be entered in the medical marijuana authorization database and hold a recognition card for identification.

“Not the entire medical community supports CBD oil,” said Rep. Blake. According to the representative from Aberdeen, the minor’s guardian would come to school, take the child from class, give the treatment and then go on with their day.

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