Jose Kuder, petty officer third class, is welcomed back by JJ Hughes during the homecoming for electronic attack squadron 142 Tuesday. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

Jose Kuder, petty officer third class, is welcomed back by JJ Hughes during the homecoming for electronic attack squadron 142 Tuesday. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

Home for the holidays: VAQ-142 back on Whidbey

The Gray Wolves of Electronic Attack Squadron 142 returned to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island Tuesday after a six-month deployment. Over 100 family members and friends met the crew on the tarmac that afternoon.

“It feels amazing, unreal almost,” said Jose Kuder, petty officer third class, of coming home.

The squadron served aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz and conducted an array of missions, including support of Operation Inherent Resolve, according to a press release.

“This particular deployment has presented a number of unique challenges to the Gray Wolf team,” said VAQ-142 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Brett Stevenson in a prepared news release.

“From enduring the daily onslaught of triple digit temperatures and humidity of the Arabian Gulf, to the fast-paced and complex environment in which our aircrews operated over Iraq and Syria, this team delivered flawlessly on a daily basis with pride and professionalism.”

The team of 142 men and women departed NAS Whidbey Island in June with five EA-18G Growler electronic attack aircraft and went first to NAS North Island in San Diego before deployment in the Indo-Asia Pacific region and the Arabian Gulf.

The Gray Wolves flew more than 1,000 hours and executed nearly 200 combat missions in support of operations in Iraq and Syria.

VAQ-142 also provided electronic attack in support of high-priority U.S. central command tasking.

The squadron was additionally able to “experience local culture” and participate in voluntary activities ashore in Manama, Bahrain and Dubai, United Arab Emirates, the release said.

Before returning to the U.S., the Gray Wolves participated in strike force operations in the Western Pacific and flew in exercises with carriers and B-1B Lancer aircraft from the U.S. Air Force.

During deployment, 16 squadron members earned enlisted air warfare specialist qualification, VAQ-142 leadership awarded sailors 16 Air Medals, two safety professionals awards, three Navy Commendation Medals, 29 Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals, nine Good Conduct Medals, 10 flag letters of commendation, 21 letters of commendation and seven letters of appreciation.

“This is my third deployment and this one was definitely the hottest,” said Jerome Boring, aviation structural mechanic (equipment) first class said in the statement.

“There’s a certain measure of extra pride and professionalism I see when it comes to working on the Growlers.

“There’s a desire in the squadron to take the time and get everything right and make sure our planes not only work their best, but also look their best.”

A couple embraces during the homecoming for Electronic Attack Squadron 142 Tuesday. The Gray Wolves were deployed for six months. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

A couple embraces during the homecoming for Electronic Attack Squadron 142 Tuesday. The Gray Wolves were deployed for six months. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

Joshua, petty officer first class, Robi Gordon and their baby Asher head home after Joshua’s homecoming from a six-month deployment with VAQ-142. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

Joshua, petty officer first class, Robi Gordon and their baby Asher head home after Joshua’s homecoming from a six-month deployment with VAQ-142. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

A sailor greets his baby after returning Tuesday from a six-month deployment with Electronic Attack Squadron 142. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

A sailor greets his baby after returning Tuesday from a six-month deployment with Electronic Attack Squadron 142. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

More in News

Prosecutor declines to charge Langley police chief with crime

The Island County prosecutor won’t charge Langley Police Chief David Marks with… Continue reading

Registration open for returning students at SVC

Registration for returning students is underway for summer and fall quarters at… Continue reading

Oak Harbor FamilyCare Physical Therapy becomes NorthSound Physical Therapy.

On June 1, Oak Harbor FamilyCare Physical Therapy officially becomes “NorthSound Physical… Continue reading

Naval Air Station Whidbey Island open house

Naval Air Station Whidbey Island will host its annual open house for… Continue reading

Whidbey Nonprofit Gifts Funds to Local Volunteer Organizations and Lighthouses

The Lighthouse Environmental Programs, or LEP, nonprofit group of Whidbey continues to… Continue reading

Art school hosting presentation by National Geographic photographer

Renowned photographer Sam Abell will give a lecture and photo presentation at… Continue reading

Oak Harbor Council creates taxing district to fund roadwork

Oak Harbor City Council adopted an ordinance that should help the city… Continue reading

Bench will be dedicated to longtime Oak Harbor leader

Kiwanis Club of Oak Harbor and the Oak Harbor School District will… Continue reading

Photo by Maria Matson/Whidbey News-Times
                                Janelle Solomon, 12, from the Lummi Nation’s Ultimate Warrior Canoe Club carries a canoe along with Regina Miller, who is about to participate in the Woman’s Singles races. See the story on page A9 of today’s Whidbey News-Times.
Water Fest draws up to 4,000 people

Bead by bead, three-and-a-half year old Ezra Malloy strung together a colorful… Continue reading

Most Read