The Coupeville School Board gave Superintendent Jim Shank and excellent review and extended his contract another year during a school board meeting Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. File photo by Ron Newberry/Whidbey News-Times

Coupeville school board extends superintendent’s contract

Superintendent Jim Shank received an “excellent” annual review by the Coupeville School Board, extending his contract with the school district for another year, said school board President Kathleen Anderson.

Shank’s contract essentially was rolled over, keeping it at three years.

There was no change to his annual salary, Anderson said, adding that compensation will be negotiated in June.

Last summer, the school board approved a $133,105 annual salary for Shank, plus a $30,000 supplemental contract for his role as the school district’s director of special education.

“First of all, I’m grateful,” Shank said of the extension. “I’m thankful to be able to work here and have the opportunity to be with so many good people associated with learning and children.

“From a personal aspect, Coupeville’s a great town. There are many, many good people here that want the best for kids. They support the schools and put forth, I believe, their best efforts, which makes our job as educators really really nice.”

Shank is in his fourth year as Coupeville’s superintendent, maintaining continuity after the school district was led by three interim superintendents during the 2012-13 school year following Patty Page’s departure.

Page left to accept the position of superintendent in the North Kitsap School District.

Shank, originally from Longview, worked as superintendent of the Juab School District in Utah prior to coming to Coupeville.

During his time in Coupeville, voters approved a capital facilities levy in 2015 that led to ongoing facility improvements. The district’s switch to a 5-by-5 schedule that offers more electives to high school and middle school students was well received.

In October, the school district reported a 93.5 percent graduation rate by the Class of 2016, a nearly 9 percent increase from the previous year.

Part of that success was attributed to Open Den, a separate school in the district started in 2014 that helps students at least 16 years of age who are behind in credits and looking for an alternative environment to traditional school.

“He’s been with us for four years,” Anderson said. “You can start building and you can keep adding to the building blocks.”

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