Lanni Johnson, in the center, and the members of the North Olympic Orca Pod activist group, protest at the capitol building, Friday, for the removal of the four lower Snake River Dams. Johnson is on a 17-day hunger strike to honor Tahlequah, a mother Orca who carried her dead calf for 17-days last year. — Photo by Emma Emperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Lanni Johnson, in the center, and the members of the North Olympic Orca Pod activist group, protest at the capitol building, Friday, for the removal of the four lower Snake River Dams. Johnson is on a 17-day hunger strike to honor Tahlequah, a mother Orca who carried her dead calf for 17-days last year. — Photo by Emma Emperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Activists rally for woman on hunger strike to draw attention to plight of orcas

  • Tuesday, April 16, 2019 7:49pm
  • News

Photos by Emma Epperly

WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Lanni Johnson of Snohomish is on a 17-day fast in front of the Washington State Capitol building, to convince lawmakers the Southern Resident Orcas need help now.

On Friday more people who worry about the survival of the orcas, which have been declining in numbers, set up displays and joined Johnson in front of the Capitol.

Johnson’s fast, a length chosen in honor of the mother orca who carried her dead calf for 17-days in 2018, will end on Wednesday

A display put up by the “North Olympic Orca Pod,” an activist group pushing for the removal of the four lower Snake River dams, shows the remaining Southern Resident Orcas. There are 75 orcas currently alive in the region. The group also put up a “ghost fin” display showing the 35 orcas who have died since 2005. — Photo by Emma Emperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau

A display put up by the “North Olympic Orca Pod,” an activist group pushing for the removal of the four lower Snake River dams, shows the remaining Southern Resident Orcas. There are 75 orcas currently alive in the region. The group also put up a “ghost fin” display showing the 35 orcas who have died since 2005. — Photo by Emma Emperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Members of the Palouse Tribe join the protest lead by tribal elder, Carrie Chapman-Schuster, who was forcibly removed from her land in 1959 in order for the lower Snake River dams to be built. Lanni Johnson is seated at center. — Photo by Emma Emperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau

Members of the Palouse Tribe join the protest lead by tribal elder, Carrie Chapman-Schuster, who was forcibly removed from her land in 1959 in order for the lower Snake River dams to be built. Lanni Johnson is seated at center. — Photo by Emma Emperly, WNPA Olympia News Bureau

More in News

Sewage plant recognized as project of the year

Oak Harbor’s new clean water facility was recently honored as one of… Continue reading

Workshop looks at rising sea level

Whidbey Island dwellers may have a interest in the effects rising sea… Continue reading

Man held on $100,000 bail for child porn

An Oak Harbor man admitted to having “multiple gigabytes” of child pornography… Continue reading

Pumpkin pickers needed

Liz Sherman picks sugar pie pumpkins at Sherman’s Pioneer Farm in Coupeville.… Continue reading

Leaders work on plan to end homelessness

Whidbey leaders and residents have been discussing the issue of homelessness for… Continue reading

Agreement reached between hospital, island fire districts

After months of negotiating, North and Central Whidbey fire districts have reached… Continue reading

Getting clean: Family reunites, offers hope for others battling addiction

Daniel and Adriana Aivles were addicted to heroin and living out of… Continue reading

Dog owners still breaking leash laws at Greenbank Farm

To address ongoing issues with dogs straying into farmland at the Greenbank… Continue reading

Island County cuts off its funding for Spin Cafe

An Oak Harbor day shelter for homeless people is hoping to repair… Continue reading

Most Read