News

No hot hounds allowed in cars

This mini-pooch loudly defends its territory while left alone in a parked car near the Oak Harbor Wal-Mart. Despite the recent rise in temperatures, pet owners continue to leave their animals in the car while on errands around town. This pet appeared to be fine.  - Jenny Manning/Whidbey News-Times
This mini-pooch loudly defends its territory while left alone in a parked car near the Oak Harbor Wal-Mart. Despite the recent rise in temperatures, pet owners continue to leave their animals in the car while on errands around town. This pet appeared to be fine.
— image credit: Jenny Manning/Whidbey News-Times

A hot dog can easily end up a dead dog.

Animals, like humans, are prone to heat exhaustion during the hot summer months.

A closed car can mean disaster for an animal left behind, even if windows are partially rolled down.

“Your dog could die because it gets very hot,” said Nancy Moffitt, Oak Harbor animal control officer.

An experiment by Stanford University researchers found that the inside car temperature, on a mild 72-degree day, can climb to 116 degrees within an hour.

The same study concluded that 85 degrees outside translates to an internal auto temperature of 102 degrees in 10 minutes and 120 degrees in 30 minutes.

According to the Whidbey Island Animal’s Improvement Foundation officials, an overheated animal may suffering nerve damage, heart problems, liver damage, brain damage or even death as a result of heat stroke.

According to United Animal Nations, a California-nonprofit dedicated to providing care for animals in crisis, warm weather is known to prove fatal for four-legged family members left unattended in a hot car.

“People mean well by taking their dogs or other animals along with them while they work, visit, shop or run errands, but warm weather can turn a car into a death trap,” said Nicole Forsyth, president of United Animal Nations.

Island County Red Cross warns pet owners to be especially vigilant of heat stroke symptoms. Heat stroke in animals may require emergency medical attention. Cool the animal down with wet towels, spray with cool water and provide ice chips while en route to the vet.

During the dog days of summer keep an eye on Fido and friends, or leave them at home where they’ll be more comfortable.

Community Events, April 2014

Add an Event
We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Apr 16 edition online now. Browse the archives.