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Candidates follow the money

A great deal of money is already flowing into campaigns that need to woo Whidbey Island voters.

When it comes to the races that affect the island, there are contests for two Island County commissioner, two state representatives, a state senator and a U.S. representative. The only candidate who doesn’t have a rival so far is Island County Auditor Sheilah Crider; she was appointed last year and has to run in the November election to keep the position.

One of the most hotly contested races is for Island County Commissioner, position 1, which covers South and Central Whidbey Island. Two Republicans, a Democrat and a candidate with no party affiliation are vying for the spot.

Helen Price-Johnson, a Democrat from Clinton, has raised the most so far, about $29,000 from a long list of small donors, according to the Public Disclosure Commission Web site. Those who donated include Larry Kwarsick, Coupeville’s town planner and the former county public works director, Island County Prosecutor Greg Banks, Commissioner John Dean, former Langley Mayor Neil Colburn and the Progressive Majority.

Island County Commissioner Phil Bakke, a Republican, comes in second, having raised $19,700 so far. The former county planning director was appointed to the position last year after Mike Shelton resigned. Shelton’s wife Marla contributed to Bakke’s campaign, as did Kimberly Blain of Payless Foods, Oak Harbor Mayor Jim Slowik, County Risk Manager Betty Kemp and Oak Harbor attorney Jacob Cohen.

Reece Rose, a Republican from Clinton, has raised $4,700 so far from donors that include Marion Henny, the owner of Whidbey Telecom, and $875 from her own bank account.

Curt Gordon of Clinton is running with no party preference. So far, he’s raised $850 from a business and two individuals, the PDC reports.

In the race for county commissioner, position 2, neither of the candidates have reported donations yet. The position covers the Oak Harbor area. Republican incumbent Mac McDowell, an Oak Harbor resident, is being challenged by Angela Homola, a Democrat from Oak Harbor.

A total of five candidates are running for two District 10 positions for the House of Representatives. Incumbent Rep. Barbara Bailey, a Republican from Oak Harbor in position 2, has two challengers from the Democratic party. Ann McDonald, a Port of Coupeville commissioner, and Patricia Terry, a registered nurse who lives on Camano Island, are taking Bailey on.

Bailey already has a war chest of $46,000. Those who donated to her include many high-profile names from Oak Harbor: Mayor Jim Slowik, City Administrator Paul Schmidt, former mayor Patty Cohen, Councilwoman Beth Munns, Krieg Construction, the Koetje Agency, Yonkman Construction and the Casual House.

Bailey also received sizable donations from large firms, including Aetna, Inc., Boeing, Philip Morris, Puget Sound Energy, Regence Blueshield and Wal-Mart.

Terry received about $17,800 so far in small donations. Those who gave her money include Island County Assessor David Mattens, Coupeville Mayor Nancy Conard, Island County Commissioner John Dean and Island County Treasurer Linda Riffe.

McDonald reported receiving about $4,600 in small donations from people in Western Washington and other states.

In position 1, Norma Smith, a Republican from Clinton, was appointed to the seat in March. She will run against Mount Vernon teacher Tim Knue, a Democrat who two years ago ran against Bailey.

Smith hasn’t reported receiving any money yet, according to the PDC. Knue has $25,000 from such donors as Riffe, Mattens, Gary Piazzon of Coupeville and Helen Chatfied-Weeks of Oak Harbor.

Sen. Mary Margaret Haugen, D-Clinton, is being challenged by Linda Haddon, a Republican from Oak Harbor, and Sarah Hart, an Oak Harbor resident who is affiliated with the new America’s Third Party.

Haugen has already raised a whopping $52,000 in large and small donations. She received much of her money from a combination of large companies and political action committees, including Boeing, Delta Dental, Campaign for Tribal Self-Reliance, Premera Blue Cross, Puget Sound Pilots, Todd Pacific Shipyards and the Washington Federation of State Employees.

Haddon has raised nearly $25,000. Some of the notable Oak Harbor givers include Chamber of Commerce Director Jill Johnson, Island County Sheriff Mark Brown, Barney Beeksma, former mayor Cohen, Lyle Bull, Councilman Jim Palmer and Mayor Slowik’s wife, Candace.

Hart hasn’t reported receiving any donations.

When it comes to federal government, Rep. Rick Larsen, a Democrat, represents the district that includes Whidbey Island. He is being challenged by Rick Bart, a Republican and the former Snohomish County sheriff.

Larsen has already raised $815,000 so far in pursuit of his fifth term. Bart hasn’t reported any donation yet, according to the Federal Election Commission Web site. But he raised about $19,000 in his kick-off campaign event last month, according to the Everett Herald.

Oak Harbor resident David Jon Sponheim, co-founder of America’s Third Party, is running as a write-in presidential candidate.

You can reach News-Times reporter Jessie Stensland at jstensland@whidbeynewstimes.com or call 675-6611.

A great deal of money is already flowing into campaigns that need to woo Whidbey Island voters.

When it comes to the races that affect the island, there are contests for two Island County commissioner, two state representatives, a state senator and a U.S. representative. The only candidate who doesn’t have a rival so far is Island County Auditor Sheilah Crider; she was appointed last year and has to run in the November election to keep the position.

One of the most hotly contested races is for Island County Commissioner, position 1, which covers South and Central Whidbey Island. Two Republicans, a Democrat and a candidate with no party affiliation are vying for the spot.

Helen Price-Johnson, a Democrat from Clinton, has raised the most so far, about $29,000 from a long list of small donors, according to the Public Disclosure Commission Web site. Those who donated include Larry Kwarsick, Coupeville’s town planner and the former county public works director, Island County Prosecutor Greg Banks, Commissioner John Dean, former Langley Mayor Neil Colburn and the Progressive Majority.

Island County Commissioner Phil Bakke, a Republican, comes in second, having raised $19,700 so far. The former county planning director was appointed to the position last year after Mike Shelton resigned. Shelton’s wife Marla contributed to Bakke’s campaign, as did Kimberly Blain of Payless Foods, Oak Harbor Mayor Jim Slowik, County Risk Manager Betty Kemp and Oak Harbor attorney Jacob Cohen.

Reece Rose, a Republican from Clinton, has raised $4,700 so far from donors that include Marion Henny, the owner of Whidbey Telecom, and $875 from her own bank account.

Curt Gordon of Clinton is running with no party preference. So far, he’s raised $850 from a business and two individuals, the PDC reports.

In the race for county commissioner, position 2, neither of the candidates have reported donations yet. The position covers the Oak Harbor area. Republican incumbent Mac McDowell, an Oak Harbor resident, is being challenged by Angela Homola, a Democrat from Oak Harbor.

A total of five candidates are running for two District 10 positions for the House of Representatives. Incumbent Rep. Barbara Bailey, a Republican from Oak Harbor in position 2, has two challengers from the Democratic party. Ann McDonald, a Port of Coupeville commissioner, and Patricia Terry, a registered nurse who lives on Camano Island, are taking Bailey on.

Bailey already has a war chest of $46,000. Those who donated to her include many high-profile names from Oak Harbor: Mayor Jim Slowik, City Administrator Paul Schmidt, former mayor Patty Cohen, Councilwoman Beth Munns, Krieg Construction, the Koetje Agency, Yonkman Construction and the Casual House.

Bailey also received sizable donations from large firms, including Aetna, Inc., Boeing, Philip Morris, Puget Sound Energy, Regence Blueshield and Wal-Mart.

Terry received about $17,800 so far in small donations. Those who gave her money include Island County Assessor David Mattens, Coupeville Mayor Nancy Conard, Island County Commissioner John Dean and Island County Treasurer Linda Riffe.

McDonald reported receiving about $4,600 in small donations from people in Western Washington and other states.

In position 1, Norma Smith, a Republican from Clinton, was appointed to the seat in March. She will run against Mount Vernon teacher Tim Knue, a Democrat who two years ago ran against Bailey.

Smith hasn’t reported receiving any money yet, according to the PDC. Knue has $25,000 from such donors as Riffe, Mattens, Gary Piazzon of Coupeville and Helen Chatfied-Weeks of Oak Harbor.

Sen. Mary Margaret Haugen, D-Clinton, is being challenged by Linda Haddon, a Republican from Oak Harbor, and Sarah Hart, an Oak Harbor resident who is affiliated with the new America’s Third Party.

Haugen has already raised a whopping $52,000 in large and small donations. She received much of her money from a combination of large companies and political action committees, including Boeing, Delta Dental, Campaign for Tribal Self-Reliance, Premera Blue Cross, Puget Sound Pilots, Todd Pacific Shipyards and the Washington Federation of State Employees.

Haddon has raised nearly $25,000. Some of the notable Oak Harbor givers include Chamber of Commerce Director Jill Johnson, Island County Sheriff Mark Brown, Barney Beeksma, former mayor Cohen, Lyle Bull, Councilman Jim Palmer and Mayor Slowik’s wife, Candace.

Hart hasn’t reported receiving any donations.

When it comes to federal government, Rep. Rick Larsen, a Democrat, represents the district that includes Whidbey Island. He is being challenged by Rick Bart, a Republican and the former Snohomish County sheriff.

Larsen has already raised $815,000 so far in pursuit of his fifth term. Bart hasn’t reported any donation yet, according to the Federal Election Commission Web site. But he raised about $19,000 in his kick-off campaign event last month, according to the Everett Herald.

Oak Harbor resident David Jon Sponheim, co-founder of America’s Third Party, is running as a write-in presidential candidate.

You can reach News-Times reporter Jessie Stensland at jstensland@whidbeynewstimes.com or call 675-6611.

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