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Island Thrift celebrates 30 years of generosity

By Amanda Gordon

Staff reporter

For $30 at Island Thrift, you can walk away with an armload of clothes, shoes, toys, and CDs.

For 30 years of contributing to your community, you simply can't put a price on the rewards.

Since 1981, Island Thrift has given over $4.2 million to the Whidbey Island community, all generated by donations from generous locals, and supported by shoppers who don't mind sorting through junk to find a few treasures.

Monday marked Island Thrift's 30th anniversary and the aisles were full of shoppers congregated for a common reason: They were looking for a steal - the kind of purchase to brag to friends about. Some shoppers chose the route of quantity over quality, like Nathaniel Cruz, 9.

"I'm looking for toys. Lots and lots of toys!"

The storewide 50 percent off sale made it easy to find a good purchase. Whether they were searching for the perfect vintage hat or an old Justin Timberlake CD, shoppers agreed that Island Thrift is a unique spot to shop. "The people here are so nice. What they do is great. The money goes to help children and charities," said Gwen Oest, who was browsing with her grandchildren Ysrael and Sierra Soldier.

At Island Thrift, giving is the fun part of the organization.

"We give to nonprofit organizations and we like to help out new organizations. Its always fun giving away money," said John McNamara, board member.

The Island Thrift board of directors includes active citizens who are involved with other projects and businesses in the community.

As a result, "We have a good understanding of where money needs to go in the community," said Peggy Whitford, president of the board.

The list of charities that Island Thrift supports includes the Child Abuse Prevention Foundation, Citizens Against Domestic and Sexual Abuse (CADA), Community Resource Network, Pregnancy Care Clinic, Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE), Compass Health, Lifeline Trust Fund, North Whidbey Help House, Oak Harbor Senior Center, Opportunity Council, Planned Parenthood of Island County, Senior Services of Island County, Toddler Learning Center, Whidbey Animals Improvement Foundation (WAIF), and YMCA. Island Thrift has also given to the John Vanderzicht Memorial Pool, HOPE, Relay for Life, Daybreak respite program, Meals on Wheels, Lifeline, the senior center, Whidbey Playhouse, the Forgotten Children's Fund, Head Start, the stadium fund, Margie's House, and Whidbey General Hospital.

Thrift shop donors can drop off their previously loved items at the rear of Island Thrift, located on Barrington Drive above the post office, while bargain hunters can snatch up treasures within the building. There is no charge for donating items, so the two-fold idea is genius: get rid of your junk, and sniff out some deals.

The hard work of sifting through donors items falls to Island Thrift's employees, like Carlee Borka, who served punch and cookies to hungry shoppers on Monday.

Borka enjoys working at Island Thrift, describing it as "a great first job."

Employee Jerrica Jenkins, who has more than one year of experience with Island Thrift, enjoys the close-knit nature of its employees. The familiarity and friendship between the employees is evident.

"We all get along. It's like a big family here. That's why it's hard hiring new people sometimes, because we have to make sure they get along with everyone," Jenkins said.

It's not just the employees that Jenkins enjoys, either.

"This is our cutest Island Thrift shopper right here," says Jenkins, toting an armload of clothes as she passed Jeannie Teel, a loyal Island Thrift customer.

"I never buy anything new!" said Teel. She proves her point, showing off a fashionable ensemble put together completely from thrift store bargains. Jenkins and Teel took a moment from searching the racks to catch up. Teel is a frequent Island Thrift customer, as are many who work and shop at the store.

Rebecca Salazar, store manager, has been sifting through Whidbey's junk for over 18 years.

"I love living here, and it's a great job. Not only do I get a paycheck, but I get to give back," Salazar said.

The best part of her job is knowing that her work goes to help local charities.

"We've helped an awful lot of people," Salazar said.

For more information, call (360) 675-1133.

By Amanda Gordon

Staff reporter

For $30 at Island Thrift, you can walk away with an armload of clothes, shoes, toys, and CDs.

For 30 years of contributing to your community, you simply can't put a price on the rewards.

Since 1981, Island Thrift has given over $4.2 million to the Whidbey Island community, all generated by donations from generous locals, and supported by shoppers who don't mind sorting through junk to find a few treasures.

Monday marked Island Thrift's 30th anniversary and the aisles were full of shoppers congregated for a common reason: They were looking for a steal - the kind of purchase to brag to friends about. Some shoppers chose the route of quantity over quality, like Nathaniel Cruz, 9.

"I'm looking for toys. Lots and lots of toys!"

The storewide 50 percent off sale made it easy to find a good purchase. Whether they were searching for the perfect vintage hat or an old Justin Timberlake CD, shoppers agreed that Island Thrift is a unique spot to shop. "The people here are so nice. What they do is great. The money goes to help children and charities," said Gwen Oest, who was browsing with her grandchildren Ysrael and Sierra Soldier.

At Island Thrift, giving is the fun part of the organization.

"We give to nonprofit organizations and we like to help out new organizations. Its always fun giving away money," said John McNamara, board member.

The Island Thrift board of directors includes active citizens who are involved with other projects and businesses in the community.

As a result, "We have a good understanding of where money needs to go in the community," said Peggy Whitford, president of the board.

The list of charities that Island Thrift supports includes the Child Abuse Prevention Foundation, Citizens Against Domestic and Sexual Abuse (CADA), Community Resource Network, Pregnancy Care Clinic, Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE), Compass Health, Lifeline Trust Fund, North Whidbey Help House, Oak Harbor Senior Center, Opportunity Council, Planned Parenthood of Island County, Senior Services of Island County, Toddler Learning Center, Whidbey Animals Improvement Foundation (WAIF), and YMCA. Island Thrift has also given to the John Vanderzicht Memorial Pool, HOPE, Relay for Life, Daybreak respite program, Meals on Wheels, Lifeline, the senior center, Whidbey Playhouse, the Forgotten Children's Fund, Head Start, the stadium fund, Margie's House, and Whidbey General Hospital.

Thrift shop donors can drop off their previously loved items at the rear of Island Thrift, located on Barrington Drive above the post office, while bargain hunters can snatch up treasures within the building. There is no charge for donating items, so the two-fold idea is genius: get rid of your junk, and sniff out some deals.

The hard work of sifting through donors items falls to Island Thrift's employees, like Carlee Borka, who served punch and cookies to hungry shoppers on Monday.

Borka enjoys working at Island Thrift, describing it as "a great first job."

Employee Jerrica Jenkins, who has more than one year of experience with Island Thrift, enjoys the close-knit nature of its employees. The familiarity and friendship between the employees is evident.

"We all get along. It's like a big family here. That's why it's hard hiring new people sometimes, because we have to make sure they get along with everyone," Jenkins said.

It's not just the employees that Jenkins enjoys, either.

"This is our cutest Island Thrift shopper right here," says Jenkins, toting an armload of clothes as she passed Jeannie Teel, a loyal Island Thrift customer.

"I never buy anything new!" said Teel. She proves her point, showing off a fashionable ensemble put together completely from thrift store bargains. Jenkins and Teel took a moment from searching the racks to catch up. Teel is a frequent Island Thrift customer, as are many who work and shop at the store.

Rebecca Salazar, store manager, has been sifting through Whidbey's junk for over 18 years.

"I love living here, and it's a great job. Not only do I get a paycheck, but I get to give back," Salazar said.

The best part of her job is knowing that her work goes to help local charities.

"We've helped an awful lot of people," Salazar said.

For more information, call (360) 675-1133.

By Amanda Gordon

Staff reporter

For $30 at Island Thrift, you can walk away with an armload of clothes, shoes, toys, and CDs.

For 30 years of contributing to your community, you simply can't put a price on the rewards.

Since 1981, Island Thrift has given over $4.2 million to the Whidbey Island community, all generated by donations from generous locals, and supported by shoppers who don't mind sorting through junk to find a few treasures.

Monday marked Island Thrift's 30th anniversary and the aisles were full of shoppers congregated for a common reason: They were looking for a steal - the kind of purchase to brag to friends about. Some shoppers chose the route of quantity over quality, like Nathaniel Cruz, 9.

"I'm looking for toys. Lots and lots of toys!"

The storewide 50 percent off sale made it easy to find a good purchase. Whether they were searching for the perfect vintage hat or an old Justin Timberlake CD, shoppers agreed that Island Thrift is a unique spot to shop. "The people here are so nice. What they do is great. The money goes to help children and charities," said Gwen Oest, who was browsing with her grandchildren Ysrael and Sierra Soldier.

At Island Thrift, giving is the fun part of the organization.

"We give to nonprofit organizations and we like to help out new organizations. Its always fun giving away money," said John McNamara, board member.

The Island Thrift board of directors includes active citizens who are involved with other projects and businesses in the community.

As a result, "We have a good understanding of where money needs to go in the community," said Peggy Whitford, president of the board.

The list of charities that Island Thrift supports includes the Child Abuse Prevention Foundation, Citizens Against Domestic and Sexual Abuse (CADA), Community Resource Network, Pregnancy Care Clinic, Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE), Compass Health, Lifeline Trust Fund, North Whidbey Help House, Oak Harbor Senior Center, Opportunity Council, Planned Parenthood of Island County, Senior Services of Island County, Toddler Learning Center, Whidbey Animals Improvement Foundation (WAIF), and YMCA. Island Thrift has also given to the John Vanderzicht Memorial Pool, HOPE, Relay for Life, Daybreak respite program, Meals on Wheels, Lifeline, the senior center, Whidbey Playhouse, the Forgotten Children's Fund, Head Start, the stadium fund, Margie's House, and Whidbey General Hospital.

Thrift shop donors can drop off their previously loved items at the rear of Island Thrift, located on Barrington Drive above the post office, while bargain hunters can snatch up treasures within the building. There is no charge for donating items, so the two-fold idea is genius: get rid of your junk, and sniff out some deals.

The hard work of sifting through donors items falls to Island Thrift's employees, like Carlee Borka, who served punch and cookies to hungry shoppers on Monday.

Borka enjoys working at Island Thrift, describing it as "a great first job."

Employee Jerrica Jenkins, who has more than one year of experience with Island Thrift, enjoys the close-knit nature of its employees. The familiarity and friendship between the employees is evident.

"We all get along. It's like a big family here. That's why it's hard hiring new people sometimes, because we have to make sure they get along with everyone," Jenkins said.

It's not just the employees that Jenkins enjoys, either.

"This is our cutest Island Thrift shopper right here," says Jenkins, toting an armload of clothes as she passed Jeannie Teel, a loyal Island Thrift customer.

"I never buy anything new!" said Teel. She proves her point, showing off a fashionable ensemble put together completely from thrift store bargains. Jenkins and Teel took a moment from searching the racks to catch up. Teel is a frequent Island Thrift customer, as are many who work and shop at the store.

Rebecca Salazar, store manager, has been sifting through Whidbey's junk for over 18 years.

"I love living here, and it's a great job. Not only do I get a paycheck, but I get to give back," Salazar said.

The best part of her job is knowing that her work goes to help local charities.

"We've helped an awful lot of people," Salazar said.

For more information, call (360) 675-1133.

Cutline:

Island Thrift employees from left to right: Wendy Kettlewell, Barb Grey, Julie Wilhelm, Tashie LeMaitre, Jerrica Jenkins, Peggy Whitford, John McNamara, Rebecca Salazar and Aida Martinez. Island Thrift thanks all the donors and shoppers who over the years have made the store a success. "We love to support our community by donating all proceeds to organizations on Whidbey Island," said Peggy Whitford, board member.

Cutline:

Jacqueline Dias takes advantage of the storewide 50 percent off sale on Monday at Island Thrift.

Cutline:

Jerrica Jenkins, Island Thrift employee, organizes clothing during the 30 year anniversary sale at Island Thrift.

Island Thrift celebrates 30 years of giving

By Amanda Gordon

Staff reporter

For $30 at Island Thrift, you can walk away with an armload of clothes, shoes, toys, and CDs.

For 30 years of contributing to your community, you simply can't put a price on the rewards.

Since 1981, Island Thrift has given over $4.2 million to the Whidbey Island community, all generated by donations from generous locals, and supported by shoppers who don't mind sorting through junk to find a few treasures.

Monday marked Island Thrift's 30th anniversary and the aisles were full of shoppers congregated for a common reason: They were looking for a steal - the kind of purchase to brag to friends about. Some shoppers chose the route of quantity over quality, like Nathaniel Cruz, 9.

"I'm looking for toys. Lots and lots of toys!"

The storewide 50 percent off sale made it easy to find a good purchase. Whether they were searching for the perfect vintage hat or an old Justin Timberlake CD, shoppers agreed that Island Thrift is a unique spot to shop. "The people here are so nice. What they do is great. The money goes to help children and charities," said Gwen Oest, who was browsing with her grandchildren Ysrael and Sierra Soldier.

At Island Thrift, giving is the fun part of the organization.

"We give to nonprofit organizations and we like to help out new organizations. Its always fun giving away money," said John McNamara, board member.

The Island Thrift board of directors includes active citizens who are involved with other projects and businesses in the community.

As a result, "We have a good understanding of where money needs to go in the community," said Peggy Whitford, president of the board.

The list of charities that Island Thrift supports includes the Child Abuse Prevention Foundation, Citizens Against Domestic and Sexual Abuse (CADA), Community Resource Network, Pregnancy Care Clinic, Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE), Compass Health, Lifeline Trust Fund, North Whidbey Help House, Oak Harbor Senior Center, Opportunity Council, Planned Parenthood of Island County, Senior Services of Island County, Toddler Learning Center, Whidbey Animals Improvement Foundation (WAIF), and YMCA. Island Thrift has also given to the John Vanderzicht Memorial Pool, HOPE, Relay for Life, Daybreak respite program, Meals on Wheels, Lifeline, the senior center, Whidbey Playhouse, the Forgotten Children's Fund, Head Start, the stadium fund, Margie's House, and Whidbey General Hospital.

Thrift shop donors can drop off their previously loved items at the rear of Island Thrift, located on Barrington Drive above the post office, while bargain hunters can snatch up treasures within the building. There is no charge for donating items, so the two-fold idea is genius: get rid of your junk, and sniff out some deals.

The hard work of sifting through donors items falls to Island Thrift's employees, like Carlee Borka, who served punch and cookies to hungry shoppers on Monday.

Borka enjoys working at Island Thrift, describing it as "a great first job."

Employee Jerrica Jenkins, who has more than one year of experience with Island Thrift, enjoys the close-knit nature of its employees. The familiarity and friendship between the employees is evident.

"We all get along. It's like a big family here. That's why it's hard hiring new people sometimes, because we have to make sure they get along with everyone," Jenkins said.

It's not just the employees that Jenkins enjoys, either.

"This is our cutest Island Thrift shopper right here," says Jenkins, toting an armload of clothes as she passed Jeannie Teel, a loyal Island Thrift customer.

"I never buy anything new!" said Teel. She proves her point, showing off a fashionable ensemble put together completely from thrift store bargains. Jenkins and Teel took a moment from searching the racks to catch up. Teel is a frequent Island Thrift customer, as are many who work and shop at the store.

Rebecca Salazar, store manager, has been sifting through Whidbey's junk for over 18 years.

"I love living here, and it's a great job. Not only do I get a paycheck, but I get to give back," Salazar said.

The best part of her job is knowing that her work goes to help local charities.

"We've helped an awful lot of people," Salazar said.

For more information, call (360) 675-1133.

By Amanda Gordon

Staff reporter

For $30 at Island Thrift, you can walk away with an armload of clothes, shoes, toys, and CDs.

For 30 years of contributing to your community, you simply can't put a price on the rewards.

Since 1981, Island Thrift has given over $4.2 million to the Whidbey Island community, all generated by donations from generous locals, and supported by shoppers who don't mind sorting through junk to find a few treasures.

Monday marked Island Thrift's 30th anniversary and the aisles were full of shoppers congregated for a common reason: They were looking for a steal - the kind of purchase to brag to friends about. Some shoppers chose the route of quantity over quality, like Nathaniel Cruz, 9.

"I'm looking for toys. Lots and lots of toys!"

The storewide 50 percent off sale made it easy to find a good purchase. Whether they were searching for the perfect vintage hat or an old Justin Timberlake CD, shoppers agreed that Island Thrift is a unique spot to shop. "The people here are so nice. What they do is great. The money goes to help children and charities," said Gwen Oest, who was browsing with her grandchildren Ysrael and Sierra Soldier.

At Island Thrift, giving is the fun part of the organization.

"We give to nonprofit organizations and we like to help out new organizations. Its always fun giving away money," said John McNamara, board member.

The Island Thrift board of directors includes active citizens who are involved with other projects and businesses in the community.

As a result, "We have a good understanding of where money needs to go in the community," said Peggy Whitford, president of the board.

The list of charities that Island Thrift supports includes the Child Abuse Prevention Foundation, Citizens Against Domestic and Sexual Abuse (CADA), Community Resource Network, Pregnancy Care Clinic, Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE), Compass Health, Lifeline Trust Fund, North Whidbey Help House, Oak Harbor Senior Center, Opportunity Council, Planned Parenthood of Island County, Senior Services of Island County, Toddler Learning Center, Whidbey Animals Improvement Foundation (WAIF), and YMCA. Island Thrift has also given to the John Vanderzicht Memorial Pool, HOPE, Relay for Life, Daybreak respite program, Meals on Wheels, Lifeline, the senior center, Whidbey Playhouse, the Forgotten Children's Fund, Head Start, the stadium fund, Margie's House, and Whidbey General Hospital.

Thrift shop donors can drop off their previously loved items at the rear of Island Thrift, located on Barrington Drive above the post office, while bargain hunters can snatch up treasures within the building. There is no charge for donating items, so the two-fold idea is genius: get rid of your junk, and sniff out some deals.

The hard work of sifting through donors items falls to Island Thrift's employees, like Carlee Borka, who served punch and cookies to hungry shoppers on Monday.

Borka enjoys working at Island Thrift, describing it as "a great first job."

Employee Jerrica Jenkins, who has more than one year of experience with Island Thrift, enjoys the close-knit nature of its employees. The familiarity and friendship between the employees is evident.

"We all get along. It's like a big family here. That's why it's hard hiring new people sometimes, because we have to make sure they get along with everyone," Jenkins said.

It's not just the employees that Jenkins enjoys, either.

"This is our cutest Island Thrift shopper right here," says Jenkins, toting an armload of clothes as she passed Jeannie Teel, a loyal Island Thrift customer.

"I never buy anything new!" said Teel. She proves her point, showing off a fashionable ensemble put together completely from thrift store bargains. Jenkins and Teel took a moment from searching the racks to catch up. Teel is a frequent Island Thrift customer, as are many who work and shop at the store.

Rebecca Salazar, store manager, has been sifting through Whidbey's junk for over 18 years.

"I love living here, and it's a great job. Not only do I get a paycheck, but I get to give back," Salazar said.

The best part of her job is knowing that her work goes to help local charities.

"We've helped an awful lot of people," Salazar said.

For more information, call (360) 675-1133.

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