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Election ballots are in the mail

With three weeks to go before next month’s general election, voters will soon be able to cast their ballots.

The Island County Auditor’s Office mailed out 40,656 ballots to voters Tuesday, Oct. 16. For ballots to count, they have to be postmarked no later than election day, Nov. 6.

Although it’s an all-mail election, people wishing to cast their ballot in person and save the price of a stamp can take advantage of several drop-off places scattered throughout Whidbey Island that will be open on election day.

On Central and North Whidbey Island, votes can be dropped off at the Oak Harbor School District Administrative Service Center, or at the Island County Auditor’s Office in Coupeville.

This election season is a competitive one on North Whidbey as city council and mayoral positions are contested.

The Oak Harbor races are heating up in the weeks leading up to the election. Jim Slowik and Paul Brewer hope to fill the mayor’s seat that is being vacated by Patty Cohen. In the city council races, Beth Munns is squaring off against Chris Hiteshew, Bob Morrison is challenging Jim Palmer, and Rick Almberg is facing Mel Vance.

Coupeville Mayor Nancy Conard is facing her first challenge in 12 years as mayor. Gordon Burton hopes to unseat her this fall. The three council positions that are up for elections are also facing challengers this year. Ann Dannhauer is challenging Marshall Bronson, Gary Piazzon is challenging Bob Clay and Roxallanne Medley is challenging Molly Hughes.

On the Oak Harbor School Board, David Sherman and William Burnett are vying for an open spot. Other positions are uncontested.

There are a number of smaller, but important races voters will have to make a decision on. One seat on the Port of Coupeville board is up for election. Incumbent Benye Weber is facing a challenge from Dennis Parbs.

Bert Speir and Ron Wallin are competing for a vacancy on the Public Hospital District board.

There are also a variety of state ballot measures that concern tax increases, school district maintenance and operations levies, and inmate labor.

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