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Islanders unite against Citizens United decision

Oak Harbor resident Marshall Goldberg addresses the Island County commissioners in Coupeville. Goldberg is a member of Citizens Ignited, a group working to overturn a 2010 Supreme Court ruling. - Justin Burnett / Whidbey News-Times
Oak Harbor resident Marshall Goldberg addresses the Island County commissioners in Coupeville. Goldberg is a member of Citizens Ignited, a group working to overturn a 2010 Supreme Court ruling.
— image credit: Justin Burnett / Whidbey News-Times

A group of Whidbey Island residents has joined a national chorus of people and states who are taking a stand against the Supreme Court decision commonly known as Citizens United.

“We call ourselves Citizens Ignited,” said Oak Harbor resident Marshall Goldberg, in a message he delivered to the Island County commissioners during the board’s regular meeting on May 21.

Goldberg showed up with a small group of supporters, many of whom were holding signs with messages such as “Get money out of politics,” “Corporations are not people” and “Overturn Citizens United.”

The group of Whidbey residents is opposed to the landmark 2010 court decision in the case of Citizens United v. the Federal Election Commission. The court essentially determined that corporations and unions have the same First Amendment free speech rights as people and that the government could not restrict them from making independent political expenditures.

Citizens Ignited is collecting signatures from Island County registered voters for a citizens’ advisory petition. The hope is to convince local elected officials and boards to pass resolutions opposing the court ruling.

“You are our voice and we need you to express the will of the people,” Goldberg said.

Along with the Island County commissioners, the group also hit the Langley City Council, the Coupeville Town Council and is planning to visit the Oak Harbor City Council at its next meeting.

The hope is to persuade the state Legislature into passing a resolution that would support an amendment to the U.S. Constitution. If enough states followed suit, an amendment could be authorized and overturn the decision.

According to the Move to Amend website, movetoamend.org, so far at least four states and 120 local governments, including the Seattle City Council, have passed resolutions or ordinances against corporate personhood.

For more information or to get involved, contact Goldberg at 675-5888.

 

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