Lifestyle

Noteworthy seashells donated to Whidbey General Hospital

Whidbey General Hospital was recently honored with a loving gift that will serve as a lasting tribute to the great care provided by its employees.

During his almost 97 years of life, Coupeville resident Trevor Roberts assembled a world-class exotic shell collection and had them artfully displayed in his home. He traveled all over the world to find beautiful and rare specimens. His efforts were featured in the Whidbey News-Times.

Over the last several years, Roberts was  served by various hospital departments, most recently, the hospital’s Home Health Care and Hospice. After he passed, the majority of his collection was donated to a permanent exhibit at the Pacific Northwest Shell Club, but Roberts wanted the most significant pieces to come to the hospital where he had received his care.

Last Friday, his final gift was thoughtfully assembled by his sons, Sandy and Ron, in the hospital’s Quiet Room off the main lobby. Hospital officials said they would like to thank the entire Roberts family for the generous gift.

In a 2009 Whidbey News-Times article about his home collection, Roberts was quoted as saying that he hoped someday his shells might be in a museum where people can see them. He would be pleased to know that his gift is now in a place in the Quiet Room.

“His legacy could serve to provide solace or joy to people in need, and we are grateful for this gift,” hospital spokeswoman Trish Rose said in a press release.

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