A lamb playfully nudges Kyle Flack at Bell’s Farm. (Photos by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times)

A lamb playfully nudges Kyle Flack at Bell’s Farm. (Photos by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times)

Spring into action

  • Tuesday, March 19, 2019 3:27pm
  • Life

The snow has melted, the sun is out and noses are sniffling as they inhale the newly spawned allergens floating in the air. March 20 marks the first official day of spring this year in the Northern Hemisphere.

So far, it’s come in more like a lamb than a lion— fingers crossed.

The days leading to spring’s start recorded highs of 65. Flowers are blooming and new calves are mooing. Rainy days are certain to come, but that only means greener grass and more plentiful gardens.

Although the winter was a bit harsher, and whiter, than usual, livestock are thriving. Central Whidbey’s Bell’s Farm and Bailey Farm both reported early arrivals of lambs and calves respectively. Tiny fuzzy bunnies and puny peeping chicks have also been seen bouncing and flapping around Willowood Farm.

Even more baby animals are expected any day.

A calf gnaws on hay with the older cows, despite being not old enough to actually eat it.

A calf gnaws on hay with the older cows, despite being not old enough to actually eat it.

Kyle Flack holds Mussels, born during Musselfest weekend. The lamb was the Bell’s Farm’s latest addition at the time.

Kyle Flack holds Mussels, born during Musselfest weekend. The lamb was the Bell’s Farm’s latest addition at the time.

Georgie Smith holds two French angora rabbits at Willowood Farm of Ebey’s Prairie. The bunnies were only about 3-weeks old.

Georgie Smith holds two French angora rabbits at Willowood Farm of Ebey’s Prairie. The bunnies were only about 3-weeks old.

A ruby-eyed white French Angora baby bunny peeks out from its enclosure at Willowood Farm.

A ruby-eyed white French Angora baby bunny peeks out from its enclosure at Willowood Farm.

Chicks that just barely grew their wing feathers scramble over each other to get some food at Willowood Farm.

Chicks that just barely grew their wing feathers scramble over each other to get some food at Willowood Farm.

One of the several new lambs at Bell’s Farm struts around the field on a sunny day.

One of the several new lambs at Bell’s Farm struts around the field on a sunny day.

A calf sticks its tongue out hoping to get a taste of some hay at Bailey Farm.

A calf sticks its tongue out hoping to get a taste of some hay at Bailey Farm.

More in Life

Giraffe Heroes: Honoring those who do the right thing, regardless of obstacles

There aren’t any live giraffes in Langley, but the blue Giraffe Building… Continue reading

Journey into the African savanna

Disney’s The Lion King Jr. showing at Whidbey Playhouse through July 28

Share the shore during pup season, look but don’t touch seals

Advocates for marine mammals are making their annual pitch to beach watchers… Continue reading

Top 4-H student of the year reflects on experiences | Whidbey Island Fair

SWHS grad Camden Miller participated in the horse division for years, switched to cattle this year

All kids on deck: New park makes a splash

Children play in the cool water of the new splash park, Shipwreck… Continue reading

A chance to learn about Whidbey waters

Guided Beach Walks program an opportunity to spot wildlife, learn about ocean

Art & About | Whidbey Island’s July art events

• SECOND SATURDAY ART WALK at Historic GREENBANK FARM is 2-5 p.m.,… Continue reading

Patriotism on parade in Oak Harbor

American spirit was on proud display at Oak Harbor’s Fourth of July… Continue reading

Sweet treats to beat the heat

Fruity recipes from Bell’s Farm, Lavender Wind and Mutiny Bay Distillery

Radio Club holds annual Field Day

Island County Commissioner Helen Price Johnson and Island County Amateur Radio Club… Continue reading

Navy open house draws fans of all ages to Ault Field

Although the Navy’s presence is always visible around Oak Harbor, both on… Continue reading