Potbelly’s original members perform in 1996. Photo provided

Potbelly’s original members perform in 1996. Photo provided

Punk band to celebrate another anniversary with Whidbey show

One of Whidbey Island’s longest-lasting punk rock bands is hoping to inspire a new generation of angsty teenagers.

“The (punk) scene will build up again, just need new venues and new bands,” said Jason Rodger, a founding member of and vocalist for Potbelly. “Not just us old bastards.”

Because of this, the North Whidbey resident said he’s “stoked” about the band’s 24th anniversary show at 8 p.m., Jan. 18 at the Machine Shop in Langley.

Rodger was 17 years old when he, Ken Ball, Ryan Thompson and Curtis Jay formed the punk group 24 years ago. Other members have come and gone, but Rodger and Ball, a bassist and singer, have remained a constant in the group that has over 100 releases. They also tour frequently. After 10 years in existence, the members have tried to do an anniversary show in the area each year since.

The free Machine Shop show is special to Rogers because it’s not in a bar and all ages can attend.

“Right now, there’s some kid thinking what I was, they’re mad there’s no scene and they just have to do something about it,” Rodger said.

Both he and Ball said they’ve witnessed the punk scene on Whidbey rise and fall multiple times since they formed in 1995. They both indicated a major problem is a lack of places to perform, but there also seems to be a lack of people trying to do so.

“I’ve been through a few cycles with this sort of thing,” Ball said. “It’s time for some new excitement about having music around.”

Ball said he doesn’t think it has to be music, but showing younger people that it’s fun to have a creative outlet can have a positive impact. As a teenager, Rodger said he had a tendency to get into trouble when he didn’t have an outlet.

Music is what came naturally to him; it was somewhere he felt he belonged. He hears melodies everywhere, he said, pointing out the rhythm of a nearby fan. He called it both “torturous and a blessing.”

“For me, music is embedded in me in such a way that I can’t escape it,” Rodger said.

The band’s longevity and productivity wouldn’t be possible without this passion. But Ball said he and Rodger’s ability to get along together is what has kept Potbelly around.

“It’s a lot of work getting stuff together, writing songs and practicing,” he said. “I don’t think that would happen unless we were good at being around each other.”

Today Ball and Roger are joined by guitar player and singer Christen Ogden, guitar player Joe Neverkwitz and drummer Justin Bone. The group recently finished recording 25 songs for its newest album that features Ron Reyes of Black Flag as a vocalist in some of the songs. Potbelly plans to go on tour in the summer.

Each of the members has a day job to support their music habit. And no longer teenagers, they have families and children to consider while they record and travel across the country on tours.

Rodger, who has a 16-year-old son, said it can be a difficult balancing act at times. Some days are harder than others, but his family continues to be supportive of his punk-rock lifestyle.

The music defines him, he said, and he’d probably become “unpredictable” if his art was suppressed.

“We’re all addicts,” he said. “Music is our addiction. … I’m sure my family appreciates that I’m not shooting up heroin, and I’m playing guitar instead.”

Potbelly’s current line-up —- composed of singer Jason Rodger, singer and bassist Ken Ball, singer and guitarist Christen Ogden, guitarist Joe Neverkwitz and drummer Justin Bone —- perform at a gig in Everett in November. Photo provided

Potbelly’s current line-up —- composed of singer Jason Rodger, singer and bassist Ken Ball, singer and guitarist Christen Ogden, guitarist Joe Neverkwitz and drummer Justin Bone —- perform at a gig in Everett in November. Photo provided

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