N. Whidbey car show rumbles through town

This 1977 Ford Maverick, owned by Jordan Paiz, is displayed among other cars in its division at the North Whidbey Car Show Saturday. The show featured 233 vehicles across 21 categories. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

While the Coupeville Arts &Crafts Festival was going on, others gathered in Oak Harbor to enjoy their own kind of art—cars.

With fresh paint, wax and unique customizations, the vehicles at the North Whidbey Car Show truly were works of art. The event, held by the North Whidbey Lions Club, raised around $8,000.

“It all goes back into the community,” said Terry Beatty, chairman of the show.

Over 230 vehicles were entered to compete for trophies in 21 different categories. Ray Poletti won both the people’s choice award and best of show with his 1940 Lincoln 3-Window.

The show featured car show veterans and first timers alike. Jess Jones of Marysville had entered a few hundred car shows, but this was his first time at the one in Oak Harbor.

“We’ll come back next year, and bring more people,” he said.

Stan and Nancy Baker, Langley, are just starting to get into car shows after they got their 1959 Morris Minor firetruck restored in May.

The old truck was used by the Kittitas County Fire District for parades, rodeos and trips to schools. When Stan retired as fire chief, the district gave him the little pickup because they knew he wanted it.

“They didn’t want to store it anymore,” said Nancy with a laugh.

The two enjoyed their first car show in Oak Harbor, and plan to do several more throughout the summer.

“This one is neat because of the size, you get to see lots of cars in each category,” Nancy said.

John Lussmyer, Greenbank, brought his electric pickup truck to the Oak Harbor show for the third year in a row.

“I tend to bring the truck just to show it can be done,” Lussmyer said.

He converted the Ford F-250 to an electric vehicle seven years ago, and then re-converted it to a longer lasting lithium battery three years ago. He said with the 70-mile range it now has, the pickup became his main mode of transportation. During the summer he takes the truck to a show about every other weekend.

Around 3,500 people attended the show.

“The gear heads and the people who like cars, they come because we always put on a good show,” said Beatty.

A classic car owner drives his vehicle at the North Whidbey Car Show on Saturday at Wind Jammer Park. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

More in Life

Cider Fest rules!

Event features freshly-pressed juice, food, music

Photo by Maria Matson / Whidbey News-Times
                                <em>Whidbey Island resident Dick Evans will be signing and selling copies of his book, “Fazkils,” at the Clinton Community Hall on Saturday.</em>
In a new book, Hollywood actor, author reflects on his life, career

Richard “Dick” Evans is an actor, writer and director with a long… Continue reading

Free jammin’ and campin’ at fairgrounds added to Djangofest

The Island County Fairgrounds Campground will be filled with music later this… Continue reading

Virtuosos join forces at Djangofest

At 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 23, Grammy-winning classical guitarist Jason Vieaux will… Continue reading

Raptors ready to roost at annual festival

Get up close with nature’s hunting aviators Saturday

Photos by Maria Matson / Whidbey News Group
                                <em>Bob Becker and his son, Bob Becker Jr., sit at Becker’s house in Coupeville. Becker turned age 103 on Sept. 11.</em>
Passing the century mark

‘It feels no different from when I was 80’

Celebrating an artistic legacy

When a longtime member passed away last March, her colleagues at Whidbey… Continue reading

Growing strong after 25 years

Bayview Farm and Garden celebrates anniversary

Real life couple shines on stage in dynamic performance at Whidbey Playhouse

There are two reasons to see “Daddy Long Legs,” opening Friday at… Continue reading

Woodpalooza features wordworking talent

Woodworking may seem like a hobby for those in their golden years,… Continue reading

Longtime director exits WICA stage

Burgua a guiding force during theater’s turbulent early years

Peeking inside an artists’ world

Annual island tour opens studio doors