N. Whidbey car show rumbles through town

This 1977 Ford Maverick, owned by Jordan Paiz, is displayed among other cars in its division at the North Whidbey Car Show Saturday. The show featured 233 vehicles across 21 categories. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

While the Coupeville Arts &Crafts Festival was going on, others gathered in Oak Harbor to enjoy their own kind of art—cars.

With fresh paint, wax and unique customizations, the vehicles at the North Whidbey Car Show truly were works of art. The event, held by the North Whidbey Lions Club, raised around $8,000.

“It all goes back into the community,” said Terry Beatty, chairman of the show.

Over 230 vehicles were entered to compete for trophies in 21 different categories. Ray Poletti won both the people’s choice award and best of show with his 1940 Lincoln 3-Window.

The show featured car show veterans and first timers alike. Jess Jones of Marysville had entered a few hundred car shows, but this was his first time at the one in Oak Harbor.

“We’ll come back next year, and bring more people,” he said.

Stan and Nancy Baker, Langley, are just starting to get into car shows after they got their 1959 Morris Minor firetruck restored in May.

The old truck was used by the Kittitas County Fire District for parades, rodeos and trips to schools. When Stan retired as fire chief, the district gave him the little pickup because they knew he wanted it.

“They didn’t want to store it anymore,” said Nancy with a laugh.

The two enjoyed their first car show in Oak Harbor, and plan to do several more throughout the summer.

“This one is neat because of the size, you get to see lots of cars in each category,” Nancy said.

John Lussmyer, Greenbank, brought his electric pickup truck to the Oak Harbor show for the third year in a row.

“I tend to bring the truck just to show it can be done,” Lussmyer said.

He converted the Ford F-250 to an electric vehicle seven years ago, and then re-converted it to a longer lasting lithium battery three years ago. He said with the 70-mile range it now has, the pickup became his main mode of transportation. During the summer he takes the truck to a show about every other weekend.

Around 3,500 people attended the show.

“The gear heads and the people who like cars, they come because we always put on a good show,” said Beatty.

A classic car owner drives his vehicle at the North Whidbey Car Show on Saturday at Wind Jammer Park. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

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