Crime solved: Langley’s mystery weekend comes to a close

Langley’s 30th annual mystery weekend came to a close Sunday, as residents and out-of-towners cracked the case of “The Deadly Deed.” More than 1,000 people joined fictional detective I.B. Fuzz to solve the murder during the 30th Langley Mystery Weekend sponsored by the Langley Chamber of Commerce. The complex story, by Loretta Martin, wove together 24 characters as suspects in the murder of fictional Italian citizen Carmelo Geaherdelli.

Langley’s 30th annual mystery weekend came to a close Sunday, as residents and out-of-towners cracked the case of “The Deadly Deed.”

More than 1,000 people joined fictional detective I.B. Fuzz to solve the murder during the 30th Langley Mystery Weekend sponsored by the Langley Chamber of Commerce. The complex story, by Loretta Martin, wove together 24 characters as suspects in the murder of fictional Italian citizen Carmelo Geaherdelli.

On the first day, suspicions were scattered amongst the characters as clues were gathered from more than 30 participating businesses.

For Evan Mahnken of Bellevue, the top suspect was one of the 49ers club members. The club claimed ownership of the deceased Geaherdelli’s properties.

Mahnken is no newbie to Langley’s mysteries. This was his sixth year participating in the event.

Mahnken spent some time questioning Geaherdelli’s son, Dino, regarding his whereabouts the night of his father’s murder in front of Good Cheer Thrift Store on Saturday. The son dodged Mahnken’s questions in front of a growing crowd of passers-by, but revealed to Mahnken he did not know how his father earned his fortune.

The mystery has become a tradition for the family who visit restaurants and the South Whidbey area during the annual mystery weekend.

Kirkland resident Zach McKenna’s primary suspect was character Max Lawless, who represented a real estate developer interested in Geaherdelli’s assets.

“I don’t know why, he just seems creepy,” Zach explained.

Zach, 12, sought clues from the scene of the crime at Langley Library and tried to make sense of the evidence he saw: a feather, pen, folder and blood.

This was Zach’s third time participating in the event. Zach said he liked how the community came together to solve the mystery. He hoped to solve the crime, after being really close last year.

“In fact, I almost got it,” he said.

 

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