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Orange you glad it’s pumpkin time?

Whidbey Island’s rural landscape makes for some fun pumpkin pursuits for those who want to search for one on a farm.  The hunting was extra special for Freeland’s Sara Goss and her 3-month-old son Taylor on Sherman’s Pioneer Farm in Coupeville. Another popular place to go pumpkin hunting is Dugualla Bay Farms on North Whidbey.  - Ron Newberry/Whidbey News-Times
Whidbey Island’s rural landscape makes for some fun pumpkin pursuits for those who want to search for one on a farm. The hunting was extra special for Freeland’s Sara Goss and her 3-month-old son Taylor on Sherman’s Pioneer Farm in Coupeville. Another popular place to go pumpkin hunting is Dugualla Bay Farms on North Whidbey.
— image credit: Ron Newberry/Whidbey News-Times

This wasn’t just any old trip to a pumpkin patch for Sara Goss.

And she knows, this month won’t mark just any old Halloween.

Goss’ traditional family trip to Sherman’s Pioneer Farm in Coupeville included a new family member -- Goss’ first child, 3-month-old son Taylor Arnold.

“What is all this fun stuff?” she said to her son, wearing a jacket that matched the bright orange surroundings.

“This is your first pumpkin patch!”

Goss came to Sherman’s Pioneer Farm on S. Ebey Road Thursday with her parents, siblings and friends.

They’ve gone to other farms on Whidbey Island in search of the perfect pumpkins, but are stuck on Sherman’s.

“We get to do some carving tonight,” said Jim Duccini, Sara’s dad.

“I spoiled them all last year. I got out the power tools. Drills and saws. It goes a little bit faster.”

Duccini said he insisted, however, that his family still pulls out “the innards” of the large gourds.

“I’m looking for the most contorted pumpkin,” he added, “to make a strange face. Mine is usually the scariest of them all.”

With leaves turning color and other signs of fall in the air, families such as this one from Freeland are maximizing the island’s rural offerings.

Duccini said the idea of going to a grocery store wasn’t as appealing as a trip to the countryside to partake in a local farm’s harvest.

Sherman’s Pioneer Farm often includes tractor rides to the patch and a massive selection of pumpkins to pick through.

Another popular pumpkin patch can be found on North Whidbey at Dugualla Bay Farms on State Highway 20 just under the flight path of approaching aircraft.

At Dugualla Bay, there is a corn maze and hayrides and a wide selection of carving pumpkins and sugar and “ghost” varieties.

Beginning last weekend, popularity for plucking pumpkins picked up.

“We’re pretty much in a constant state of craziness,” Dugualla Bay Farms employee Katheryne Atteberry said.

A pumpkin patch also can be found at the Case Farm in Oak Harbor off Case Road. There, pumpkins and other produce are for sale.

But keep your fingers away from the turkeys.

 

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