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Students don’t waste their art skills on recycling contest

Madeline Lins, Lindsay Inouye and Jack Shapira, pictured with Dave Zylstra, Christian School principal, won a recycling art contest. - --
Madeline Lins, Lindsay Inouye and Jack Shapira, pictured with Dave Zylstra, Christian School principal, won a recycling art contest.
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While all Oak Harbor elementary schools were invited to participate in an art contest to make signs promoting recycling for garbage trucks, the three winners are from the Oak Harbor Christian School.

Parents, teachers and fellow classmates gathered around to see the signs as three garbage trucks drove into the school parking lot in April.

The three winning students beamed as they posed for pictures with their principal, Dave Zylstra, according to a press release.

Look for their artwork in the mobile art gallery on city garbage and recycling trucks.

Winners are: Lindsay Inouye, first grade, with her art, “Don’t trash our earth;” Madeline Lins, fifth grade, with her art, “Stop throwing things away. There is no away;” and Jack Shapira, fifth grade, with his artwork, “Recycle Man.”

Artwork was submitted to Oak Harbor city staff, who voted on their favorites. Cathy Rosen, public works director, and Maribeth Crandell, environmental educator, made the final decisions.

Artwork was chosen for its message, creativity and artist appeal.

Crandell also offers free classroom presentations for students in kindergarten through 12th grade that teach students how to reduce waste and recycle at school and home.

Examples of the hands-on classes Crandell teaches include Wonderful Worms, where students help set up a worm bin, Recycle Relay, where kids get a chance to sort trash and the Wheel of Waste, a game like Wheel of Fortune that can be used to test students’ knowledge.

For elementary schools, Crandell uses the Newberry Award winning children’s book, “Joseph Had a Little Overcoat,” to teach about repairing and reusing to make something last as long as possible. She finishes the program with a little help from her banjo and the students.

For more information, contact Maribeth Crandell at mcrandell@oakharbor.org or 279-4762.

 

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