These hidden piggy banks can be returned to a Peoples Bank branch for a prize and to be entered into a drawing for a grand prize as part of the “Pigs in Parks” contest. Photo courtesy of Peoples Bank

Peoples Bank launches pig hunt in parks

Peoples Bank recently launched its “Pigs in Parks” contest, designed to raise awareness about the importance of saving.

Until Aug. 28, there will be 250 small piggy banks hidden in parks across Island County, as well as other locations throughout Washington state. The Coupeville and the Oak Harbor offices each chose one park to hide their pigs in.

When found, each piggy bank can be returned to a local Peoples Bank branch for a prize and to be entered in a drawing to win one of six grand prizes.

Each grand prize will feature a “swag bag,” full of products provided by local businesses. Clues about where the pigs are hidden will be shared on the Peoples Bank Instagram account.

According to data released by GoBanking Rates, 26 percent of Washington state residents reported having no money at all saved. A survey by Bankrate showed that most Americans’ biggest financial regret is not saving enough money.

“With rising costs of living, along with new trends like mobile payments making it easier for people to spend money, we understand that saving money can be a real challenge,” said Michelle Barrett, executive vice president and director of retail banking and human resources at Peoples Bank. “Our Pigs in Parks campaign is a fun way to raise awareness about the importance of saving, and to show that there are reasons to save all around you — even in your neighborhood park.”

For information and rules, go to www.peoplesbank-wa.com/pigsinparks.

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