Haradas pass business torch to next generation

Steve and Kathy Harada have sold Harada Physical Therapy to their son and daughter-in-law, Erick and Caitlin Harada. Steve and Kathy opened in 2003 as a small, family-owned physical therapy practice specializing in outpatient orthopedics ranging from infants to seniors.

Kathy and Steve Harada

Steve and Kathy Harada have sold Harada Physical Therapy to their son and daughter-in-law, Erick and Caitlin Harada.

Steve and Kathy opened in 2003 as a small, family-owned physical therapy practice specializing in outpatient orthopedics ranging from infants to seniors.

The couple’s motto was to treat everyone like family, and they offered a unique “Cheers” bar atmosphere where friends and neighbors could get together to promote health and wellness.

As the practice grew, they opened a second clinic in Coupeville in 2014.

Erick previously worked for Harada Physical Therapy between 2009 and 2011 before heading to Issaquah to run a small residential physical therapy clinic for a larger company, gaining invaluable experience as a clinic director and contributing community member.

In addition to traditional physical therapy treatments, Erick is a Level 1 Clinical BikeFit Pro specializing in body ergonomics on bicycles to improve fit and efficiency.

Erick has returned to the island with his wife, Caitlin, also a native of Coupeville, to continue the legacy and tradition that his parents began.

Erick and Caitlin are expecting their first child in August.

 

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